The Resuscitation of Normative Privacy

The Resuscitation of Normative Privacy J Value Inquiry (2017) 51:383–395 DOI 10.1007/s10790-016-9584-3 Jennifer K. Greene Published online: 20 February 2017 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017 1 Introduction In 1890, Samuel D. Warren and Louis D. Brandeis published an article in the Harvard Law Review entitled ‘‘The Right to Privacy.’’ In it they wrote: Recent inventions and business methods call attention to the next step which must be taken for the protection of the person and securing to the individual what Judge Cooley calls ‘the right to be let alone.’ Instantaneous photographs and the newspaper enterprises have invaded the sacred precincts of private and domestic life; and numerous mechanical devices threaten to make good the prediction that ‘what is whispered in the closet shall be proclaimed from the house-tops.’ While it would be another seventy-five years before the right to privacy became the subject of serious discussion by philosophers and legal theorists, Warren and Brandeis’ worries were clearly prescient; inventions and business methods have indeed created the need for protection. They have also created new questions about precisely what we are protecting. Protecting privacy today is an onerous task. Information on medical conditions, online activities, smart phone usage, emails, consumer choices, library loans, and even http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Value Inquiry Springer Journals

The Resuscitation of Normative Privacy

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Philosophy; Ontology; Ethics; International Political Economy; Public International Law; Philosophy, general
ISSN
0022-5363
eISSN
1573-0492
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10790-016-9584-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

J Value Inquiry (2017) 51:383–395 DOI 10.1007/s10790-016-9584-3 Jennifer K. Greene Published online: 20 February 2017 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017 1 Introduction In 1890, Samuel D. Warren and Louis D. Brandeis published an article in the Harvard Law Review entitled ‘‘The Right to Privacy.’’ In it they wrote: Recent inventions and business methods call attention to the next step which must be taken for the protection of the person and securing to the individual what Judge Cooley calls ‘the right to be let alone.’ Instantaneous photographs and the newspaper enterprises have invaded the sacred precincts of private and domestic life; and numerous mechanical devices threaten to make good the prediction that ‘what is whispered in the closet shall be proclaimed from the house-tops.’ While it would be another seventy-five years before the right to privacy became the subject of serious discussion by philosophers and legal theorists, Warren and Brandeis’ worries were clearly prescient; inventions and business methods have indeed created the need for protection. They have also created new questions about precisely what we are protecting. Protecting privacy today is an onerous task. Information on medical conditions, online activities, smart phone usage, emails, consumer choices, library loans, and even

Journal

The Journal of Value InquirySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 20, 2017

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