The Relationship Between Duration of U.S. Residence, Educational Attainment, and Adult Health Among Asian Immigrants

The Relationship Between Duration of U.S. Residence, Educational Attainment, and Adult Health... There is substantial educational heterogeneity among Asian immigrants to the United States, suggesting that the association between duration of U.S. residence with their health outcomes and behaviors may vary considerably by educational attainment. Using data from the 2003 New Immigrant Survey (N = 2,373), we find strong evidence that the detrimental associations between duration of U.S. residence and self-reported health, activity limitation status, chronic health conditions, and current smoking are concentrated among Asian immigrants with less than a high school education; in contrast, the health outcomes and behaviors of Asian immigrants who have at least a high school degree exhibit very few differences by duration of U.S. residence. These distinct duration–health patterns by educational attainment are not explained by duration-related differences in country of origin, class of admission, or English speaking skills. We also find a stronger duration relationship with current smoking than those with the health status measures among the least educated Asian men, indicating a potential behaviorally based explanation for poorer health among Asian immigrant men with longer duration of residence. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population Research and Policy Review Springer Journals

The Relationship Between Duration of U.S. Residence, Educational Attainment, and Adult Health Among Asian Immigrants

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Social Sciences, general; Demography; Sociology, general; Population Economics
ISSN
0167-5923
eISSN
1573-7829
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11113-014-9344-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There is substantial educational heterogeneity among Asian immigrants to the United States, suggesting that the association between duration of U.S. residence with their health outcomes and behaviors may vary considerably by educational attainment. Using data from the 2003 New Immigrant Survey (N = 2,373), we find strong evidence that the detrimental associations between duration of U.S. residence and self-reported health, activity limitation status, chronic health conditions, and current smoking are concentrated among Asian immigrants with less than a high school education; in contrast, the health outcomes and behaviors of Asian immigrants who have at least a high school degree exhibit very few differences by duration of U.S. residence. These distinct duration–health patterns by educational attainment are not explained by duration-related differences in country of origin, class of admission, or English speaking skills. We also find a stronger duration relationship with current smoking than those with the health status measures among the least educated Asian men, indicating a potential behaviorally based explanation for poorer health among Asian immigrant men with longer duration of residence.

Journal

Population Research and Policy ReviewSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 29, 2014

References

  • Toward a theory-driven model of acculturation in public health research
    Abraído-Lanza, AF; Armbrister, AN; Flórez, KR; Aguirre, AN
  • Do healthy behaviors decline with greater acculturation? Implications for the Latino mortality paradox
    Abraído-Lanza, AF; Chao, MT; Florez, KR
  • Occupational mobility among legal immigrants to the United States
    Akresh, IR
  • Health service utilization among immigrants to the United States
    Akresh, IR
  • Health selection among new immigrants
    Akresh, IR; Frank, R
  • Influence of American acculturation on cigarette smoking behaviors among Asian American subpopulations in California
    An, N; Cochran, SD; Mays, VM; McCarthy, WJ
  • Race/ethnic differences in nonspecific psychological distress: Evidence from the National Health Interview Survey
    Bratter, JL; Eschbach, K
  • Why do Hispanics in the USA report poor health?
    Bzostek, S; Goldman, N; Pebley, AR

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