The Reason for the Preservation of High Instability at the yellow Gene in Drosophila melanogaster Strains Isolated from the Natural Population of Uman' during the “Mode for Mutation”

The Reason for the Preservation of High Instability at the yellow Gene in Drosophila melanogaster... Mobile genetic elements are responsible for most spontaneous mutations in Drosophila melanogaster. The discovered in the 1980s phenomenon of frequent change of the wild-type yellow phenotype for a mutant one, and vice-versa, in strains of D. melanogaster isolated from the Uman' natural population can be, according to our data, explained by repeated inversions and reinversions of the gene regulatory region located between the two copies of the hobo transposon. However, most molecular genetic events accompanying the process can occur without the phenotype change. After several generations, the strains, remaining phenotypically unchanged, can possess different molecular genetic properties with respect to yellow. Using genetically homogenous or isogenic strains for the genetic analysis or for production of the new plant cultivars or animal breeds, geneticists and breeders often face the problem of stability of the strains. In the present study, the mechanism underlying the generation of instability at the yellowlocus of D. melanogaster determined by the hobo-induced genome instability is described. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Genetics Springer Journals

The Reason for the Preservation of High Instability at the yellow Gene in Drosophila melanogaster Strains Isolated from the Natural Population of Uman' during the “Mode for Mutation”

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Biomedicine; Human Genetics
ISSN
1022-7954
eISSN
1608-3369
D.O.I.
10.1023/B:RUGE.0000021622.09855.49
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mobile genetic elements are responsible for most spontaneous mutations in Drosophila melanogaster. The discovered in the 1980s phenomenon of frequent change of the wild-type yellow phenotype for a mutant one, and vice-versa, in strains of D. melanogaster isolated from the Uman' natural population can be, according to our data, explained by repeated inversions and reinversions of the gene regulatory region located between the two copies of the hobo transposon. However, most molecular genetic events accompanying the process can occur without the phenotype change. After several generations, the strains, remaining phenotypically unchanged, can possess different molecular genetic properties with respect to yellow. Using genetically homogenous or isogenic strains for the genetic analysis or for production of the new plant cultivars or animal breeds, geneticists and breeders often face the problem of stability of the strains. In the present study, the mechanism underlying the generation of instability at the yellowlocus of D. melanogaster determined by the hobo-induced genome instability is described.

Journal

Russian Journal of GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 18, 2004

References

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