The promoter of rbcS in a C3 plant (rice) directs organ-specific, light-dependent expression in a C4 plant (maize), but does not confer bundle sheath cell-specific expression

The promoter of rbcS in a C3 plant (rice) directs organ-specific, light-dependent expression in a... The small subunit of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), encoded by rbcS, is essential for photosynthesis in both C3 and C4 plants, even though the cell specificity of rbcS expression is different between C3 and C4 plants. The C3 rbcS is specifically expressed in mesophyll cells, while the C4 rbcS is expressed in bundle sheath cells, and not mesophyll cells. Two chimeric genes were constructed consisting of the structural gene encoding β-glucuronidase (GUS) controlled by the two promoters from maize (C4) and rice (C3) rbcS genes. These constructs were introduced into a C4 plant, maize. Both chimeric genes were specifically expressed in photosynthetic organs, such as leaf blade, but not in non-photosynthetic organs. The expressions of the genes were also regulated by light. However, the rice promoter drove the GUS activity mainly in mesophyll cells and relatively low in bundle sheath cells, while the maize rbcS promoter induced the activity specifically in bundle sheath cells. These results suggest that the rice promoter contains some cis-acting elements responding in an organ-pecific and light-inducible regulation manner in maize but does not contain element(s) for bundle sheath cell-specific expression, while the maize promoter does contain such element(s). Based on this result, we discuss the similarities and differences between the rice (C3) and maize (C4) rbcS promoter in terms of the evolution of the C4 photosynthetic gene. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

The promoter of rbcS in a C3 plant (rice) directs organ-specific, light-dependent expression in a C4 plant (maize), but does not confer bundle sheath cell-specific expression

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Sciences; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1006461812053
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The small subunit of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), encoded by rbcS, is essential for photosynthesis in both C3 and C4 plants, even though the cell specificity of rbcS expression is different between C3 and C4 plants. The C3 rbcS is specifically expressed in mesophyll cells, while the C4 rbcS is expressed in bundle sheath cells, and not mesophyll cells. Two chimeric genes were constructed consisting of the structural gene encoding β-glucuronidase (GUS) controlled by the two promoters from maize (C4) and rice (C3) rbcS genes. These constructs were introduced into a C4 plant, maize. Both chimeric genes were specifically expressed in photosynthetic organs, such as leaf blade, but not in non-photosynthetic organs. The expressions of the genes were also regulated by light. However, the rice promoter drove the GUS activity mainly in mesophyll cells and relatively low in bundle sheath cells, while the maize rbcS promoter induced the activity specifically in bundle sheath cells. These results suggest that the rice promoter contains some cis-acting elements responding in an organ-pecific and light-inducible regulation manner in maize but does not contain element(s) for bundle sheath cell-specific expression, while the maize promoter does contain such element(s). Based on this result, we discuss the similarities and differences between the rice (C3) and maize (C4) rbcS promoter in terms of the evolution of the C4 photosynthetic gene.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 16, 2004

References

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