The Plant Alkaloid Camptothecin as a Novel Antifouling Compound for Marine Paints: Laboratory Bioassays and Field Trials

The Plant Alkaloid Camptothecin as a Novel Antifouling Compound for Marine Paints: Laboratory... The extensive use of copper and booster biocides in antifouling (AF) paints has raised environmental concerns and the need to develop new AF agents. In the present study, 18 alkaloids derived from terrestrial plants were initially evaluated for AF activity using laboratory bioassays with the bryozoan Bugula neritina and the barnacle Balanus albicostatus. The results showed that 4 of the 18 alkaloids were effective in inhibiting larval settlement of B. neritina, with an EC50 range of 6.18 to 43.11 μM, and 15 of the 18 alkaloids inhibited larval settlement of B. albicostatus, with EC50 values ranging from 1.18 to 67.58 μM. Field trials that incorporated five alkaloids respectively into paints with 20% w/w indicated an in situ AF efficiency of evodiamine, strychnine, camptothecin (CPT), and cepharanthine, with the most potent compound being CPT, which also exhibited stronger AF efficiency than the commercial antifoulants cuprous oxide and zinc pyrithione in the field over a period of 12 months. Further field trials with different CPT concentrations (0.1 to 20% w/w) in the paints suggested a concentration-dependent AF performance in the natural environment, and the effective concentrations to significantly inhibit settlement of biofoulers in the field were ≥ 0.5% w/w (the efficiency of 0.5% w/w lasted for 2 months). Moreover, CPT toxicity against the crustacean Artemia salina, the planktonic microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Isochrysis galbana, was examined. The results showed that 24 h LC50 of CPT against A. salina was 20.75 μM, and 96 h EC50 (growth inhibition) values of CPT to P. tricornutum and I. galbana were 55.81 and 6.29 μM, respectively, indicating that CPT was comparatively less toxic than several commercial antifoulants previously reported. Our results suggest the novel potential application of CPT as an antifoulant. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Marine Biotechnology Springer Journals

The Plant Alkaloid Camptothecin as a Novel Antifouling Compound for Marine Paints: Laboratory Bioassays and Field Trials

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Microbiology; Zoology; Engineering, general
ISSN
1436-2228
eISSN
1436-2236
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10126-018-9834-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The extensive use of copper and booster biocides in antifouling (AF) paints has raised environmental concerns and the need to develop new AF agents. In the present study, 18 alkaloids derived from terrestrial plants were initially evaluated for AF activity using laboratory bioassays with the bryozoan Bugula neritina and the barnacle Balanus albicostatus. The results showed that 4 of the 18 alkaloids were effective in inhibiting larval settlement of B. neritina, with an EC50 range of 6.18 to 43.11 μM, and 15 of the 18 alkaloids inhibited larval settlement of B. albicostatus, with EC50 values ranging from 1.18 to 67.58 μM. Field trials that incorporated five alkaloids respectively into paints with 20% w/w indicated an in situ AF efficiency of evodiamine, strychnine, camptothecin (CPT), and cepharanthine, with the most potent compound being CPT, which also exhibited stronger AF efficiency than the commercial antifoulants cuprous oxide and zinc pyrithione in the field over a period of 12 months. Further field trials with different CPT concentrations (0.1 to 20% w/w) in the paints suggested a concentration-dependent AF performance in the natural environment, and the effective concentrations to significantly inhibit settlement of biofoulers in the field were ≥ 0.5% w/w (the efficiency of 0.5% w/w lasted for 2 months). Moreover, CPT toxicity against the crustacean Artemia salina, the planktonic microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Isochrysis galbana, was examined. The results showed that 24 h LC50 of CPT against A. salina was 20.75 μM, and 96 h EC50 (growth inhibition) values of CPT to P. tricornutum and I. galbana were 55.81 and 6.29 μM, respectively, indicating that CPT was comparatively less toxic than several commercial antifoulants previously reported. Our results suggest the novel potential application of CPT as an antifoulant.

Journal

Marine BiotechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 2, 2018

References

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