The Orexin System and Hypertension

The Orexin System and Hypertension In this review, we focus on the role of orexin signaling in blood pressure control and its potential link to hypertension by summarizing evidence from several experimental animal models of hypertension. Studies using the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) animal model of human essential hypertension show that pharmacological blockade of orexin receptors reduces blood pressure in SHRs but not in Wistar–Kyoto rats. In addition, increased activity of the orexin system contributes to elevated blood pressure and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in dark-active period Schlager hypertensive (BPH/2J) mice, another genetic model of neurogenic hypertension. Similar to these two models, Sprague-Dawley rats with stress-induced hypertension display an overactive central orexin system. Furthermore, upregulation of the orexin receptor 1 increases firing of hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neurons, augments SNA, and contributes to hypertension in the obese Zucker rat, an animal model of obesity-related hypertension. Finally, we propose a hypothesis for the implication of the orexin system in salt-sensitive hypertension. All of this evidence, coupled with the important role of elevated SNA in increasing blood pressure, strongly suggests that hyperactivity of the orexin system contributes to hypertension. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology Springer Journals

The Orexin System and Hypertension

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Biomedicine; Neurosciences; Cell Biology; Neurobiology
ISSN
0272-4340
eISSN
1573-6830
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10571-017-0487-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this review, we focus on the role of orexin signaling in blood pressure control and its potential link to hypertension by summarizing evidence from several experimental animal models of hypertension. Studies using the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) animal model of human essential hypertension show that pharmacological blockade of orexin receptors reduces blood pressure in SHRs but not in Wistar–Kyoto rats. In addition, increased activity of the orexin system contributes to elevated blood pressure and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in dark-active period Schlager hypertensive (BPH/2J) mice, another genetic model of neurogenic hypertension. Similar to these two models, Sprague-Dawley rats with stress-induced hypertension display an overactive central orexin system. Furthermore, upregulation of the orexin receptor 1 increases firing of hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neurons, augments SNA, and contributes to hypertension in the obese Zucker rat, an animal model of obesity-related hypertension. Finally, we propose a hypothesis for the implication of the orexin system in salt-sensitive hypertension. All of this evidence, coupled with the important role of elevated SNA in increasing blood pressure, strongly suggests that hyperactivity of the orexin system contributes to hypertension.

Journal

Cellular and Molecular NeurobiologySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 27, 2017

References

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