The only known white blister rust on a basal angiosperm is a member of the genus Albugo

The only known white blister rust on a basal angiosperm is a member of the genus Albugo Rare pathogens on unusual hosts are often providing valuable insight into the evolution of the pathogen group concerned, but it is often challenging to obtain sequence data for these, as because only very few, often decades-old specimens are available. One such example is Albugo tropica, the white blister pathogen of a basal angiosperm in the genus Peperomia (Piperaceae). For this species, only two, more than 70 and over 120-year-old collections available. Here, sequence data for A. tropica are reported and phylogenetic reconstructions reveal it as the sister group to all other white blister rusts of the genus Albugo. Its isolated position is also reflected by several morphological differences to the other species of the genus, such as very thin-walled sporangia and almost smooth oospores. The isolated phylogenetic position of the pathogen and its host might indicate that it is a relict species trapped on its host. The sister-group relationship to all members of the genus Albugo s.str., which have been investigated using molecular phylogenetics, hints at the possibility, that Albugo might have originated in South America or Gondwana and has later radiated in the holarctic on members of the Brassicales. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Organisms Diversity & Evolution Springer Journals

The only known white blister rust on a basal angiosperm is a member of the genus Albugo

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Gesellschaft für Biologische Systematik
Subject
Life Sciences; Biodiversity; Evolutionary Biology; Developmental Biology; Animal Systematics/Taxonomy/Biogeography; Plant Systematics/Taxonomy/Biogeography
ISSN
1439-6092
eISSN
1618-1077
D.O.I.
10.1007/s13127-017-0353-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rare pathogens on unusual hosts are often providing valuable insight into the evolution of the pathogen group concerned, but it is often challenging to obtain sequence data for these, as because only very few, often decades-old specimens are available. One such example is Albugo tropica, the white blister pathogen of a basal angiosperm in the genus Peperomia (Piperaceae). For this species, only two, more than 70 and over 120-year-old collections available. Here, sequence data for A. tropica are reported and phylogenetic reconstructions reveal it as the sister group to all other white blister rusts of the genus Albugo. Its isolated position is also reflected by several morphological differences to the other species of the genus, such as very thin-walled sporangia and almost smooth oospores. The isolated phylogenetic position of the pathogen and its host might indicate that it is a relict species trapped on its host. The sister-group relationship to all members of the genus Albugo s.str., which have been investigated using molecular phylogenetics, hints at the possibility, that Albugo might have originated in South America or Gondwana and has later radiated in the holarctic on members of the Brassicales.

Journal

Organisms Diversity & EvolutionSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 14, 2017

References

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