The nucleolus – a gateway to viral infection?

The nucleolus – a gateway to viral infection? A number of viruses and viral proteins interact with a dynamic sub-nuclear structure called the nucleolus. The nucleolus is present during interphase in mammalian cells and is the site of ribosome biogenesis, and has been implicated in controlling regulatory processes such as the cell cycle. Viruses interact with the nucleolus and its antigens; viral proteins co-localise with factors such as nucleolin, B23 and fibrillarin, and can cause their redistribution during infection. Viruses can use these components as part of their replication process, and also use the nucleolus as a site of replication itself. Many of these properties are not restricted to any particular type of virus or replication mechanism, and examples of these processes can be found in DNA, RNA and retroviruses. Evidence suggests that viruses may target the nucleolus and its components to favour viral transcription, translation and perhaps alter the cell cycle in order to promote virus replication. Autoimmunity to nucleolin and fibrillarin have been associated with a number of diseases, and by targeting the nucleolus and displacing nucleolar antigens, virus infection might play a role in the initiation of these conditions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Virology Springer Journals

The nucleolus – a gateway to viral infection?

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/the-nucleolus-a-gateway-to-viral-infection-HdYjq05Dsn
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Springer-Verlag/Wien
Subject
Legacy
ISSN
0304-8608
eISSN
1432-8798
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00705-001-0792-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A number of viruses and viral proteins interact with a dynamic sub-nuclear structure called the nucleolus. The nucleolus is present during interphase in mammalian cells and is the site of ribosome biogenesis, and has been implicated in controlling regulatory processes such as the cell cycle. Viruses interact with the nucleolus and its antigens; viral proteins co-localise with factors such as nucleolin, B23 and fibrillarin, and can cause their redistribution during infection. Viruses can use these components as part of their replication process, and also use the nucleolus as a site of replication itself. Many of these properties are not restricted to any particular type of virus or replication mechanism, and examples of these processes can be found in DNA, RNA and retroviruses. Evidence suggests that viruses may target the nucleolus and its components to favour viral transcription, translation and perhaps alter the cell cycle in order to promote virus replication. Autoimmunity to nucleolin and fibrillarin have been associated with a number of diseases, and by targeting the nucleolus and displacing nucleolar antigens, virus infection might play a role in the initiation of these conditions.

Journal

Archives of VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off