The Migrant–Nonmigrant Differentials in Prenatal Care Utilization: Evidence from Indonesia

The Migrant–Nonmigrant Differentials in Prenatal Care Utilization: Evidence from Indonesia Using the 2000 wave of Indonesian Family Life Survey (IFLS3), this study attempts to further complement studies that seek to analyze the relationship between migration and prenatal care utilization in Indonesia. The major conclusion from the multilevel logistic regression suggests that migrants are less likely than non-migrants to seek prenatal care in a public or private hospital but are more likely than non-migrants to initiate prenatal care in their first trimester and to receive four or more prenatal visits. Several measures of child, woman, household and community characteristics are also significant predictors of the location, timing and frequency of prenatal care. It is evident that the design of effective and efficient policies requires a more comprehensive knowledge of the determinants of migration and maternal healthcare services utilization. The assessment of whether the extent of the location, timing and frequency of prenatal care differs between migrants and non-migrants would have important policy implications for both individuals and society at large. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population Research and Policy Review Springer Journals

The Migrant–Nonmigrant Differentials in Prenatal Care Utilization: Evidence from Indonesia

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Social Sciences; Demography; Sociology, general; Population Economics
ISSN
0167-5923
eISSN
1573-7829
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11113-009-9163-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Using the 2000 wave of Indonesian Family Life Survey (IFLS3), this study attempts to further complement studies that seek to analyze the relationship between migration and prenatal care utilization in Indonesia. The major conclusion from the multilevel logistic regression suggests that migrants are less likely than non-migrants to seek prenatal care in a public or private hospital but are more likely than non-migrants to initiate prenatal care in their first trimester and to receive four or more prenatal visits. Several measures of child, woman, household and community characteristics are also significant predictors of the location, timing and frequency of prenatal care. It is evident that the design of effective and efficient policies requires a more comprehensive knowledge of the determinants of migration and maternal healthcare services utilization. The assessment of whether the extent of the location, timing and frequency of prenatal care differs between migrants and non-migrants would have important policy implications for both individuals and society at large.

Journal

Population Research and Policy ReviewSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 10, 2009

References

  • Bargaining power within couples and use of prenatal and delivery care in Indonesia
    Beegle, K; Frankenberg, E; Thomas, D
  • No real progress towards equity: Health of migrants and ethnic minorities on the eve of the year 2000
    Bollini, P; Siem, H
  • The social and demographic impact of the Southeast Asian Crisis of 1997–99
    Jones, G; Hull, T; Ahlburg, D
  • Generating political will for safe motherhood in Indonesia
    Shiffman, J

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