The locus coeruleus neurotoxin, DSP4, and/or a high sugar diet induce behavioral and biochemical alterations in wild-type mice consistent with Alzheimers related pathology

The locus coeruleus neurotoxin, DSP4, and/or a high sugar diet induce behavioral and biochemical... Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States where it is estimated that one in three seniors dies with AD or another dementia. Are modern lifestyle habits a contributing factor? Increased carbohydrate (sugar) consumption, stress and disruption of sleep patterns are quickly becoming the norm rather than the exception. Interestingly, seven months on a non-invasive high sucrose diet (20% sucrose in drinking water) has been shown to induce behavioral, metabolic and pathological changes consistent with AD in wild-type mice. As chronic stress and depression are associated with loss of locus coeruleus (LC) noradrenergic neurons and projections (source of anti-inflammatory and trophic factor control), we assessed the ability for a selective LC neurotoxin (DSP4) to accelerate and aggravate a high-sucrose mediated AD-related phenotype in wild-type mice. Male C57/Bl6 mice were divided into four groups: 1) saline injected, 2) DSP4 injected, 3) high sucrose drinking water (20%) or 4) DSP4 injected and high sucrose drinking water. We demonstrate that high sucrose consumption and DSP4 treatment promote an early-stage AD-related phenotype after only 3–4 months, as evidenced by elevated fecal corticosterone, increased despair, spatial memory deficits, increased AChE activity, elevated NO production, decreased pGSK3β and increased http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Metabolic Brain Disease Springer Journals

The locus coeruleus neurotoxin, DSP4, and/or a high sugar diet induce behavioral and biochemical alterations in wild-type mice consistent with Alzheimers related pathology

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Biomedicine; Neurosciences; Neurology; Metabolic Diseases; Biochemistry, general; Oncology
ISSN
0885-7490
eISSN
1573-7365
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11011-018-0263-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States where it is estimated that one in three seniors dies with AD or another dementia. Are modern lifestyle habits a contributing factor? Increased carbohydrate (sugar) consumption, stress and disruption of sleep patterns are quickly becoming the norm rather than the exception. Interestingly, seven months on a non-invasive high sucrose diet (20% sucrose in drinking water) has been shown to induce behavioral, metabolic and pathological changes consistent with AD in wild-type mice. As chronic stress and depression are associated with loss of locus coeruleus (LC) noradrenergic neurons and projections (source of anti-inflammatory and trophic factor control), we assessed the ability for a selective LC neurotoxin (DSP4) to accelerate and aggravate a high-sucrose mediated AD-related phenotype in wild-type mice. Male C57/Bl6 mice were divided into four groups: 1) saline injected, 2) DSP4 injected, 3) high sucrose drinking water (20%) or 4) DSP4 injected and high sucrose drinking water. We demonstrate that high sucrose consumption and DSP4 treatment promote an early-stage AD-related phenotype after only 3–4 months, as evidenced by elevated fecal corticosterone, increased despair, spatial memory deficits, increased AChE activity, elevated NO production, decreased pGSK3β and increased

Journal

Metabolic Brain DiseaseSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 3, 2018

References

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