The intrinsic vulnerability to fishing of coral reef fishes and their differential recovery in fishery closures

The intrinsic vulnerability to fishing of coral reef fishes and their differential recovery in... Coral reef fishes differ in their intrinsic vulnerability to fishing and rates of population recovery after cessation of fishing. We reviewed life history-based predictions about the vulnerability of different groups of coral reef fish and examined the empirical evidence for different rates of population recovery inside no-take marine reserves to (1) determine if the empirical data agree with predictions about vulnerability and (2) show plausible scenarios of recovery within fully protected reserves and periodically-harvested fishery closures. In general, larger-bodied carnivorous reef fishes are predicted to be more vulnerable to fishing while smaller-bodied species lower in the food web (e.g., some herbivores) are predicted to be less vulnerable. However, this prediction does not always hold true because of the considerable diversity of life history strategies in reef fishes. Long-term trends in reef fish population recovery inside no-take reserves are consistent with broad predictions about vulnerability, suggesting that moderately to highly vulnerable species will require a significantly longer time (decades) to attain local carrying capacity than less vulnerable species. We recommend: (1) expanding age-based demographic studies of economically and ecologically important reef fishes to improve estimates of vulnerability; (2) long term (20–40 years), if not permanent, protection of no-take reserves to allow full population recovery and maximum biomass export; (3) strict compliance to no-take reserves to avoid considerable delays in recovery; (4) carefully controlling the timing and intensity of harvesting periodic closures to ensure long-term fishery benefits; (5) the use of periodically-harvested closures together with, rather than instead of, permanent no-take reserves. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

The intrinsic vulnerability to fishing of coral reef fishes and their differential recovery in fishery closures

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Springer International Publishing Switzerland
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Zoology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11160-014-9362-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Coral reef fishes differ in their intrinsic vulnerability to fishing and rates of population recovery after cessation of fishing. We reviewed life history-based predictions about the vulnerability of different groups of coral reef fish and examined the empirical evidence for different rates of population recovery inside no-take marine reserves to (1) determine if the empirical data agree with predictions about vulnerability and (2) show plausible scenarios of recovery within fully protected reserves and periodically-harvested fishery closures. In general, larger-bodied carnivorous reef fishes are predicted to be more vulnerable to fishing while smaller-bodied species lower in the food web (e.g., some herbivores) are predicted to be less vulnerable. However, this prediction does not always hold true because of the considerable diversity of life history strategies in reef fishes. Long-term trends in reef fish population recovery inside no-take reserves are consistent with broad predictions about vulnerability, suggesting that moderately to highly vulnerable species will require a significantly longer time (decades) to attain local carrying capacity than less vulnerable species. We recommend: (1) expanding age-based demographic studies of economically and ecologically important reef fishes to improve estimates of vulnerability; (2) long term (20–40 years), if not permanent, protection of no-take reserves to allow full population recovery and maximum biomass export; (3) strict compliance to no-take reserves to avoid considerable delays in recovery; (4) carefully controlling the timing and intensity of harvesting periodic closures to ensure long-term fishery benefits; (5) the use of periodically-harvested closures together with, rather than instead of, permanent no-take reserves.

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 16, 2014

References

  • Density-dependent spillover from a marine reserve: Long-term evidence
    Abesamis, RA; Russ, GR
  • Dispersal of grouper larvae drives local resource sharing in a coral reef fishery
    Almany, GR; Hamilton, RJ; Bode, M; Matawai, M; Potuku, T; Saenz-Agudelo, P; Planes, S; Berumen, ML; Rhodes, KL; Thorrold, S; Russ, GR; Jones, GP
  • Comparison of outcomes of permanently closed and periodically harvested coral reef reserves
    Bartlett, CY; Manua, C; Cinner, J; Sutton, S; Jimmy, R; South, R; Nilsson, J; Raina, J
  • Measuring and monitoring compliance in no-take marine reserves
    Bergseth, BJ; Russ, GR; Cinner, JE
  • Persistence of self-recruitment and patterns of larval connectivity in a marine protected area network
    Berumen, ML; Almany, GR; Planes, S; Jones, GP; Saenz-Agudelo, P; Thorrold, SR
  • The trophic fingerprint of marine fisheries
    Branch, TA; Watson, R; Fulton, EA; Jennings, S; McGilliard, CR; Pablico, GT; Ricard, D; Tracey, SR

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