The interrelationship between HCO 3 − , NO 3 − , and Cl− as effective anions in the photosynthetic electron transport

The interrelationship between HCO 3 − , NO 3 − , and Cl− as effective anions in the... Thylakoids were isolated from the leaves of three different plants (Pisum sativium L., Lactuca sativa L., and Raphanus sativus L.). The addition of HCO 3 − to a suspension of salt-and HCO 3 − -epleted thylakoids (suspended in salt-free medium) raised the rate of O2 evolution up to fourfold. This stimulation could be partially replaced by the addition of chloride or nitrate ions. However, the addition of HCO 3 − in the presence of Cl− or NO 3 − resulted in a higher stimulation of O2 evolution (sixfold in the presence of nitrate and sevenfold in the presence of chloride). On the other hand, the addition of HCO 3 − to the thylakoids depleted from salt only raised the rate of O2 evolution by 10–15%, whereas 40–70% was obtained by the addition of nitrate or chloride ions. The fluorescence induction studies indicated a significant decrease in the yield of the variable fluorescence of the salt- and HCO 3 − -depleted thylakoids. A partial increase in the fluorescence yield was obtained by the addition of HCO 3 − alone. A typical fluorescence induction curves were obtained by the addition of HCO 3 − in the presence of Cl− or NO 3 − ions. The data obtained suggest a similar role for chloride and nitrate ions in O2 evolution in the Hill-reaction, which is restricted at the donor side of photosystem II, whereas bicarbonate plays its role at both sides (acceptor and donor sides). The presented data are those obtained for the thylakoids of P. sativium, which were more or less similar to those obtained for L. sativa and R. sativus. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

The interrelationship between HCO 3 − , NO 3 − , and Cl− as effective anions in the photosynthetic electron transport

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Physiology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1021443714010099
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Thylakoids were isolated from the leaves of three different plants (Pisum sativium L., Lactuca sativa L., and Raphanus sativus L.). The addition of HCO 3 − to a suspension of salt-and HCO 3 − -epleted thylakoids (suspended in salt-free medium) raised the rate of O2 evolution up to fourfold. This stimulation could be partially replaced by the addition of chloride or nitrate ions. However, the addition of HCO 3 − in the presence of Cl− or NO 3 − resulted in a higher stimulation of O2 evolution (sixfold in the presence of nitrate and sevenfold in the presence of chloride). On the other hand, the addition of HCO 3 − to the thylakoids depleted from salt only raised the rate of O2 evolution by 10–15%, whereas 40–70% was obtained by the addition of nitrate or chloride ions. The fluorescence induction studies indicated a significant decrease in the yield of the variable fluorescence of the salt- and HCO 3 − -depleted thylakoids. A partial increase in the fluorescence yield was obtained by the addition of HCO 3 − alone. A typical fluorescence induction curves were obtained by the addition of HCO 3 − in the presence of Cl− or NO 3 − ions. The data obtained suggest a similar role for chloride and nitrate ions in O2 evolution in the Hill-reaction, which is restricted at the donor side of photosystem II, whereas bicarbonate plays its role at both sides (acceptor and donor sides). The presented data are those obtained for the thylakoids of P. sativium, which were more or less similar to those obtained for L. sativa and R. sativus.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 28, 2013

References

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