The intensive care medicine agenda on acute kidney injury

The intensive care medicine agenda on acute kidney injury Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in the critically ill. Current standard of care mainly relies on identification of patients at risk, haemodynamic optimization, avoidance of nephrotoxicity and the use of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in established AKI. The detection of early biomarkers of renal tissue damage is a recent development that allows amending the late and insensitive diagnosis with current AKI criteria. Increasing evidence suggests that the consequences of an episode of AKI extend long beyond the acute hospitalization. Citrate has been established as the anticoagulant of choice for continuous RRT. Conflicting results have been published on the optimal timing of RRT and on the renoprotective effect of remote ischaemic preconditioning. Recent research has contradicted that acute tubular necrosis is the common pathology in AKI, that septic AKI is due to global kidney hypoperfusion, that aggressive fluid therapy benefits the kidney, that vasopressor therapy harms the kidney and that high doses of RRT improve outcome. Remaining uncertainties include the impact of aetiology and clinical context on pathophysiology, therapy and prognosis, the clinical benefit of biomarker-driven interventions, the optimal mode of RRT to improve short- and long-term patient and kidney outcomes, the contribution of AKI to failure of other organs and the optimal approach for assessing and promoting renal recovery. Based on the established gaps in current knowledge the trials that must have priority in the coming 10 years are proposed together with the definition of appropriate clinical endpoints. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Intensive Care Medicine Springer Journals

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg and ESICM
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Intensive / Critical Care Medicine; Anesthesiology; Emergency Medicine; Pneumology/Respiratory System; Pain Medicine; Pediatrics
ISSN
0342-4642
eISSN
1432-1238
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00134-017-4687-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in the critically ill. Current standard of care mainly relies on identification of patients at risk, haemodynamic optimization, avoidance of nephrotoxicity and the use of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in established AKI. The detection of early biomarkers of renal tissue damage is a recent development that allows amending the late and insensitive diagnosis with current AKI criteria. Increasing evidence suggests that the consequences of an episode of AKI extend long beyond the acute hospitalization. Citrate has been established as the anticoagulant of choice for continuous RRT. Conflicting results have been published on the optimal timing of RRT and on the renoprotective effect of remote ischaemic preconditioning. Recent research has contradicted that acute tubular necrosis is the common pathology in AKI, that septic AKI is due to global kidney hypoperfusion, that aggressive fluid therapy benefits the kidney, that vasopressor therapy harms the kidney and that high doses of RRT improve outcome. Remaining uncertainties include the impact of aetiology and clinical context on pathophysiology, therapy and prognosis, the clinical benefit of biomarker-driven interventions, the optimal mode of RRT to improve short- and long-term patient and kidney outcomes, the contribution of AKI to failure of other organs and the optimal approach for assessing and promoting renal recovery. Based on the established gaps in current knowledge the trials that must have priority in the coming 10 years are proposed together with the definition of appropriate clinical endpoints.

Journal

Intensive Care MedicineSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 30, 2017

References

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