The influence of body mass index on pregnancy outcome following single-embryo transfer

The influence of body mass index on pregnancy outcome following single-embryo transfer Purpose The association between obesity and reproductive outcome is controversial. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of obesity on clinical pregnancy rates following transfer of a single fresh embryo. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted at a single tertiary medical center, including all first, fresh, single-embryo transfers using non-donor oocytes, during 2008–2013. We compared clinical pregnancy rate and pregnancy outcomes of single- ton live births resulting from the transfer of a single fresh embryo in normal weight, overweight, and obese women, defined as 2 2 2 body mass index (BMI) < 25 kg/m , ≥ 25 BMI <30 kg/m , and BMI ≥ 30 kg/m ,respectively. Results Overall, 1345 cases met the inclusion criteria with 864 single-embryo transfers (SETs) in normal weight women, 292 in overweight women, and 189 SETs in obese women, resulting in 538 clinical pregnancies and 354 singleton births. The clinical pregnancy rate per transfer was similar among the three groups (41.3, 37.6, 37.5%, respectively, p = 0.416). Similarly, there were no significant differences in live births or ongoing pregnancies. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, BMI did not impact the likelihood for clinical pregnancy (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96–1.008, p =0.216). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics Springer Journals

The influence of body mass index on pregnancy outcome following single-embryo transfer

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Gynecology; Reproductive Medicine; Human Genetics
ISSN
1058-0468
eISSN
1573-7330
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10815-018-1186-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose The association between obesity and reproductive outcome is controversial. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of obesity on clinical pregnancy rates following transfer of a single fresh embryo. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted at a single tertiary medical center, including all first, fresh, single-embryo transfers using non-donor oocytes, during 2008–2013. We compared clinical pregnancy rate and pregnancy outcomes of single- ton live births resulting from the transfer of a single fresh embryo in normal weight, overweight, and obese women, defined as 2 2 2 body mass index (BMI) < 25 kg/m , ≥ 25 BMI <30 kg/m , and BMI ≥ 30 kg/m ,respectively. Results Overall, 1345 cases met the inclusion criteria with 864 single-embryo transfers (SETs) in normal weight women, 292 in overweight women, and 189 SETs in obese women, resulting in 538 clinical pregnancies and 354 singleton births. The clinical pregnancy rate per transfer was similar among the three groups (41.3, 37.6, 37.5%, respectively, p = 0.416). Similarly, there were no significant differences in live births or ongoing pregnancies. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, BMI did not impact the likelihood for clinical pregnancy (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96–1.008, p =0.216).

Journal

Journal of Assisted Reproduction and GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: May 28, 2018

References

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