The influence of a demographic change on social relationships among male golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana)

The influence of a demographic change on social relationships among male golden snub-nosed... It has been suggested that social relationships are more likely to be prone to variation in the dispersing sex than the philopatric sex. However, we know less about the dynamics of all-male groups in male-dispersing species than we do about other types of primate groups. We studied male sociality in a captive group of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana), which was composed of a one-male unit (OMU, N = 7) and an all-male unit (AMU, N = 7 or 8), in Shanghai Wild Animal Park, China. Using data collected for 6 months, during which there was a demographic change in the AMU and the alpha male was replaced by a newcomer, we found that a dramatic change in social ranks occurred accompanied by elevated aggression following this social upheaval. A proximity-based social network analysis revealed that members did not associate randomly any more but formed differentiated relationships post-upheaval, resulting in three distinct sub-units in the AMU. In terms of inter-unit interactions, significant changes were found in the affiliations between the male juvenile of OMU and AMU individuals. He interacted with AMU individuals randomly and frequently pre-upheaval, but cut down his affiliations and had a preferred partner post-upheaval, who was a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Primates Springer Journals

The influence of a demographic change on social relationships among male golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana)

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Publisher
Springer Japan
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Japan Monkey Centre and Springer Japan KK, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Zoology; Animal Ecology; Behavioral Sciences; Evolutionary Biology
ISSN
0032-8332
eISSN
1610-7365
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10329-018-0666-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It has been suggested that social relationships are more likely to be prone to variation in the dispersing sex than the philopatric sex. However, we know less about the dynamics of all-male groups in male-dispersing species than we do about other types of primate groups. We studied male sociality in a captive group of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana), which was composed of a one-male unit (OMU, N = 7) and an all-male unit (AMU, N = 7 or 8), in Shanghai Wild Animal Park, China. Using data collected for 6 months, during which there was a demographic change in the AMU and the alpha male was replaced by a newcomer, we found that a dramatic change in social ranks occurred accompanied by elevated aggression following this social upheaval. A proximity-based social network analysis revealed that members did not associate randomly any more but formed differentiated relationships post-upheaval, resulting in three distinct sub-units in the AMU. In terms of inter-unit interactions, significant changes were found in the affiliations between the male juvenile of OMU and AMU individuals. He interacted with AMU individuals randomly and frequently pre-upheaval, but cut down his affiliations and had a preferred partner post-upheaval, who was a

Journal

PrimatesSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 5, 2018

References

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