The impact of targeting policy on spouses’ demand for public goods, labor supplies and sharing rule

The impact of targeting policy on spouses’ demand for public goods, labor supplies and sharing... This paper studies the impact of targeted unconditional cash transfers on the spouses’ demand for public goods, labor supplies and sharing of resources. We estimate a collective labor supply model with distributional factors which is extended to include preferences over marketable public goods (including child goods). In this way, unlike previous research, we consider the impact of such transfers on the intrahousehold allocation of resources and distinguish between the labeling and recipient effects. We exploit the UK experience and find evidence in favor of the collective model with separable preferences over labor supplies and public goods. This finding implies a recipient effect and not a labeling effect of child benefits. Given the household’s unearned income, the bigger the wife’s bargaining power, the more the resources allocated to public goods (including child goods) and the wife’s private consumption. The results can be useful in the design of family policy which aims to improve the relative welfare of children within the family and alleviate any intrahousehold consumption inequalities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Empirical Economics Springer Journals

The impact of targeting policy on spouses’ demand for public goods, labor supplies and sharing rule

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Subject
Economics; Econometrics; Statistics for Business/Economics/Mathematical Finance/Insurance; Economic Theory/Quantitative Economics/Mathematical Methods
ISSN
0377-7332
eISSN
1435-8921
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00181-016-1134-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper studies the impact of targeted unconditional cash transfers on the spouses’ demand for public goods, labor supplies and sharing of resources. We estimate a collective labor supply model with distributional factors which is extended to include preferences over marketable public goods (including child goods). In this way, unlike previous research, we consider the impact of such transfers on the intrahousehold allocation of resources and distinguish between the labeling and recipient effects. We exploit the UK experience and find evidence in favor of the collective model with separable preferences over labor supplies and public goods. This finding implies a recipient effect and not a labeling effect of child benefits. Given the household’s unearned income, the bigger the wife’s bargaining power, the more the resources allocated to public goods (including child goods) and the wife’s private consumption. The results can be useful in the design of family policy which aims to improve the relative welfare of children within the family and alleviate any intrahousehold consumption inequalities.

Journal

Empirical EconomicsSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 22, 2016

References

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