The impact of stem cell transplantation on the natural course of peripheral T-cell lymphoma: a real-world experience

The impact of stem cell transplantation on the natural course of peripheral T-cell lymphoma: a... The role of autologous stem cell transplantation (autoSCT) as consolidating treatment for peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) is unsettled. The aim of this analysis was to investigate the impact of autoSCT in the upfront setting by intent-to-treat and to study salvage strategies after relapse. Retrospective follow-up of all patients aged 18–70 years and treated at our institution for ALK-PTCL diagnosed between 2001 and 2014. Of 117 eligible patients, diagnosis was PTCL-NOS in 34, ALCL ALK− in 31, AITL in 28, and other PTCL in 24 patients. Disregarding 20 patients who received first-line treatment externally, upfront autoSCT was not intended in 34 due to comorbidity, higher age, low IPI, physician’s decision or unknown reasons (nITT), while intent-to-transplant (ITT) was documented in 63 patients. ITT was not associated with significant benefits for 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) with 46 and 23% in the ITT group vs. 42 and 25% in the nITT group, even after multivariate adjustment for confounders. Altogether, 91 of all 117 patients relapsed or progressed. Thirty-one patients managed to proceed to salvage allografting and achieved a 5-year OS of 52%. In contrast, all 7 patients receiving salvage autoSCT relapsed and died, and only 3 of the 51 patients not eligible for SCT salvage survived. In this study, a significant benefit of intending first-line autoSCT over non-transplant induction in patients with ALK-PTCL did not emerge. Most patients fail first-line treatment and have a poor outlook if salvage alloSCT cannot be performed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Hematology Springer Journals

The impact of stem cell transplantation on the natural course of peripheral T-cell lymphoma: a real-world experience

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Hematology; Oncology
ISSN
0939-5555
eISSN
1432-0584
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00277-018-3288-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The role of autologous stem cell transplantation (autoSCT) as consolidating treatment for peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) is unsettled. The aim of this analysis was to investigate the impact of autoSCT in the upfront setting by intent-to-treat and to study salvage strategies after relapse. Retrospective follow-up of all patients aged 18–70 years and treated at our institution for ALK-PTCL diagnosed between 2001 and 2014. Of 117 eligible patients, diagnosis was PTCL-NOS in 34, ALCL ALK− in 31, AITL in 28, and other PTCL in 24 patients. Disregarding 20 patients who received first-line treatment externally, upfront autoSCT was not intended in 34 due to comorbidity, higher age, low IPI, physician’s decision or unknown reasons (nITT), while intent-to-transplant (ITT) was documented in 63 patients. ITT was not associated with significant benefits for 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) with 46 and 23% in the ITT group vs. 42 and 25% in the nITT group, even after multivariate adjustment for confounders. Altogether, 91 of all 117 patients relapsed or progressed. Thirty-one patients managed to proceed to salvage allografting and achieved a 5-year OS of 52%. In contrast, all 7 patients receiving salvage autoSCT relapsed and died, and only 3 of the 51 patients not eligible for SCT salvage survived. In this study, a significant benefit of intending first-line autoSCT over non-transplant induction in patients with ALK-PTCL did not emerge. Most patients fail first-line treatment and have a poor outlook if salvage alloSCT cannot be performed.

Journal

Annals of HematologySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 16, 2018

References

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