The Impact of Health, Wealth, and Attractiveness on Romantic Evaluation from Photographs of Faces

The Impact of Health, Wealth, and Attractiveness on Romantic Evaluation from Photographs of Faces A large literature suggests that men and women differ in their self-reported mate preferences such that men place greater weight on physical attractiveness than women do, whereas women value financial prospects more than men. Yet, little research has addressed how these differences generalize to other contexts, such as modern online dating in which mate selection may largely depend on visual cues. Distinct from the sex differences observed in previous studies relying on self-reports, we found that men and women both used perceptions of health and attractiveness to select hypothetical partners based on photographs of their faces. Importantly, although people reliably identified others’ wealth from their photographs, these perceptions did not influence men’s or women’s partner selections. Thus, men and women may select romantic partners similarly based on limited visual information. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Sexual Behavior Springer Journals

The Impact of Health, Wealth, and Attractiveness on Romantic Evaluation from Photographs of Faces

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Psychology; Sexual Behavior; Public Health; Social Sciences, general
ISSN
0004-0002
eISSN
1573-2800
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10508-017-0963-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A large literature suggests that men and women differ in their self-reported mate preferences such that men place greater weight on physical attractiveness than women do, whereas women value financial prospects more than men. Yet, little research has addressed how these differences generalize to other contexts, such as modern online dating in which mate selection may largely depend on visual cues. Distinct from the sex differences observed in previous studies relying on self-reports, we found that men and women both used perceptions of health and attractiveness to select hypothetical partners based on photographs of their faces. Importantly, although people reliably identified others’ wealth from their photographs, these perceptions did not influence men’s or women’s partner selections. Thus, men and women may select romantic partners similarly based on limited visual information.

Journal

Archives of Sexual BehaviorSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 2, 2017

References

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