“The Image” of the Regulatory Gene in Experiments with Drosophila

“The Image” of the Regulatory Gene in Experiments with Drosophila The mutants referred to as facultative dominant lethals were selected in the progeny of gamma-irradiated Drosophila males. The mutant males were viable and fertile, though their crosses with females of the yellow line yielded no daughters. The mutations obtained differed from the common mutations by (1) extremely varying penetrance of F1 hybrids from crosses with various lines; (2) the uncertain relationships between the mutant and normal alleles; (3) the different expression in somatic and germ cells; (4) the dependence of the expression on the sex of the parent that was the donor of the mutation; (5) the mass morphosis formation and (6) the frequent reversal to the norm. These mutations are assigned to the regulatory group and their specific expression (see above) can be helpful in identifying regulatory gene mutations. We assume that the specific expression of the mutations studied is related to specific properties of the regulatory genes. These properties are as follows: (1) only one out of two homologous regulatory genes is in an active state, (2) in the haploid chromosome set, the regulatory gene is represented by several alleles (cys-alleles); (3) only one allele ensures the regulatory gene activity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Genetics Springer Journals

“The Image” of the Regulatory Gene in Experiments with Drosophila

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Biomedicine; Human Genetics
ISSN
1022-7954
eISSN
1608-3369
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1016356418121
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The mutants referred to as facultative dominant lethals were selected in the progeny of gamma-irradiated Drosophila males. The mutant males were viable and fertile, though their crosses with females of the yellow line yielded no daughters. The mutations obtained differed from the common mutations by (1) extremely varying penetrance of F1 hybrids from crosses with various lines; (2) the uncertain relationships between the mutant and normal alleles; (3) the different expression in somatic and germ cells; (4) the dependence of the expression on the sex of the parent that was the donor of the mutation; (5) the mass morphosis formation and (6) the frequent reversal to the norm. These mutations are assigned to the regulatory group and their specific expression (see above) can be helpful in identifying regulatory gene mutations. We assume that the specific expression of the mutations studied is related to specific properties of the regulatory genes. These properties are as follows: (1) only one out of two homologous regulatory genes is in an active state, (2) in the haploid chromosome set, the regulatory gene is represented by several alleles (cys-alleles); (3) only one allele ensures the regulatory gene activity.

Journal

Russian Journal of GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 13, 2004

References

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