The GPSM2/LGN GoLoco motifs are essential for hearing

The GPSM2/LGN GoLoco motifs are essential for hearing The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway is responsible for polarizing and orienting cochlear hair cells during development through movement of a primary cilium, the kinocilium. GPSM2/LGN, a mitotic spindle-orienting protein associated with deafness in humans, is a PCP effector involved in kinocilium migration. Here, we link human and mouse truncating mutations in the GPSM2/LGN gene, both leading to hearing loss. The human variant, p.(Trp326*), was identified by targeted genomic enrichment of genes associated with deafness, followed by massively parallel sequencing. Lgn ΔC mice, with a targeted deletion truncating the C-terminal GoLoco motifs, are profoundly deaf and show misorientation of the hair bundle and severe malformations in stereocilia shape that deteriorates over time. Full-length protein levels are greatly reduced in mutant mice, with upregulated mRNA levels. The truncated Lgn ΔC allele is translated in vitro, suggesting that mutant mice may have partially functioning Lgn. Gαi and aPKC, known to function in the same pathway as Lgn, are dependent on Lgn for proper localization. The polarization of core PCP proteins is not affected in Lgn mutants; however, Lgn and Gαi are misoriented in a PCP mutant, supporting the role of Lgn as a PCP effector. The kinocilium, previously shown to be dependent on Lgn for robust localization, is essential for proper localization of Lgn, as well as Gαi and aPKC, suggesting that cilium function plays a role in positioning of apical proteins. Taken together, our data provide a mechanism for the loss of hearing found in human patients with GPSM2/LGN variants. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalian Genome Springer Journals

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/the-gpsm2-lgn-goloco-motifs-are-essential-for-hearing-rqj1X6cj0I
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Life Sciences; Cell Biology; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Human Genetics
ISSN
0938-8990
eISSN
1432-1777
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00335-015-9614-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway is responsible for polarizing and orienting cochlear hair cells during development through movement of a primary cilium, the kinocilium. GPSM2/LGN, a mitotic spindle-orienting protein associated with deafness in humans, is a PCP effector involved in kinocilium migration. Here, we link human and mouse truncating mutations in the GPSM2/LGN gene, both leading to hearing loss. The human variant, p.(Trp326*), was identified by targeted genomic enrichment of genes associated with deafness, followed by massively parallel sequencing. Lgn ΔC mice, with a targeted deletion truncating the C-terminal GoLoco motifs, are profoundly deaf and show misorientation of the hair bundle and severe malformations in stereocilia shape that deteriorates over time. Full-length protein levels are greatly reduced in mutant mice, with upregulated mRNA levels. The truncated Lgn ΔC allele is translated in vitro, suggesting that mutant mice may have partially functioning Lgn. Gαi and aPKC, known to function in the same pathway as Lgn, are dependent on Lgn for proper localization. The polarization of core PCP proteins is not affected in Lgn mutants; however, Lgn and Gαi are misoriented in a PCP mutant, supporting the role of Lgn as a PCP effector. The kinocilium, previously shown to be dependent on Lgn for robust localization, is essential for proper localization of Lgn, as well as Gαi and aPKC, suggesting that cilium function plays a role in positioning of apical proteins. Taken together, our data provide a mechanism for the loss of hearing found in human patients with GPSM2/LGN variants.

Journal

Mammalian GenomeSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 11, 2015

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off