The function of primate multimodal communication

The function of primate multimodal communication Language is commonly narrowed down to speech, but human face-to-face communication is in fact an intrinsically multimodal phenomenon. Despite growing evidence that the communication of non-human primates, our main model for the evolution of language, is also inherently multimodal, most studies on primate communication have focused on either gestures or vocalizations in isolation. Accordingly, the biological function of multimodal signalling remains poorly understood. In this paper, we aim to merge the perspectives of comparative psychology and behavioural ecology on multimodal communication, and review existing studies in great apes for evidence of multimodal signal function based on content-based, efficacy-based and inter-signal interaction hypotheses. We suggest that cross-species comparisons of great ape interactions in both captive and wild settings will allow us to test the conditions in which these hypotheses apply. We expect such studies to provide novel insights into the function of speech-accompanying signals and cues, such as gestures, facial expressions, and eye gaze. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Animal Cognition Springer Journals

The function of primate multimodal communication

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Behavioral Sciences; Zoology; Psychology Research
ISSN
1435-9448
eISSN
1435-9456
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10071-018-1197-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Language is commonly narrowed down to speech, but human face-to-face communication is in fact an intrinsically multimodal phenomenon. Despite growing evidence that the communication of non-human primates, our main model for the evolution of language, is also inherently multimodal, most studies on primate communication have focused on either gestures or vocalizations in isolation. Accordingly, the biological function of multimodal signalling remains poorly understood. In this paper, we aim to merge the perspectives of comparative psychology and behavioural ecology on multimodal communication, and review existing studies in great apes for evidence of multimodal signal function based on content-based, efficacy-based and inter-signal interaction hypotheses. We suggest that cross-species comparisons of great ape interactions in both captive and wild settings will allow us to test the conditions in which these hypotheses apply. We expect such studies to provide novel insights into the function of speech-accompanying signals and cues, such as gestures, facial expressions, and eye gaze.

Journal

Animal CognitionSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 6, 2018

References

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