The Floccular Syndrome: Dynamic Changes in Eye Movements and Vestibulo-ocular Reflex in Isolated Infarction of the Cerebellar Flocculus

The Floccular Syndrome: Dynamic Changes in Eye Movements and Vestibulo-ocular Reflex in Isolated... The cerebellar flocculus is a critical structure involved in the control of eye movements. Both static and dynamic abnormalities of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) have been described in animals with experimental lesions of the flocculus/paraflocculus complex. In humans, lesions restricted to the flocculus are rare so they can become an exceptional model to contrast with the clinical features in experimental animals or in patients with more generalized cerebellar diseases. Here, we examined a 67-year-old patient with an acute vestibular syndrome due to an isolated infarct of the right flocculus. We evaluated him multiple times over 6 months—to follow the changes in eye movements and vestibular function—with caloric testing, video-oculography and head-impulse testing, and the anatomical changes on imaging. Acutely, he had an ipsilateral-beating spontaneous nystagmus, bilateral gaze-evoked nystagmus, borderline impaired smooth pursuit, and a complete contraversive ocular tilt reaction. The VOR gain was reduced for head impulses directed contralateral to the lesion, and there was also an ipsilesional caloric weakness. All abnormalities progressively improved at follow-up visits but with a considerable reduction in volume of the affected flocculus on imaging. The vestibular and ocular motor findings, qualitatively similar to a previously reported patient, further clarify the “acute floccular syndrome” in humans. We also add new information about the pattern of recovery from such a lesion with corresponding changes in the size of the affected flocculus on imaging. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Cerebellum Springer Journals

The Floccular Syndrome: Dynamic Changes in Eye Movements and Vestibulo-ocular Reflex in Isolated Infarction of the Cerebellar Flocculus

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Biomedicine; Neurosciences; Neurology; Neurobiology
ISSN
1473-4222
eISSN
1473-4230
D.O.I.
10.1007/s12311-017-0878-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The cerebellar flocculus is a critical structure involved in the control of eye movements. Both static and dynamic abnormalities of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) have been described in animals with experimental lesions of the flocculus/paraflocculus complex. In humans, lesions restricted to the flocculus are rare so they can become an exceptional model to contrast with the clinical features in experimental animals or in patients with more generalized cerebellar diseases. Here, we examined a 67-year-old patient with an acute vestibular syndrome due to an isolated infarct of the right flocculus. We evaluated him multiple times over 6 months—to follow the changes in eye movements and vestibular function—with caloric testing, video-oculography and head-impulse testing, and the anatomical changes on imaging. Acutely, he had an ipsilateral-beating spontaneous nystagmus, bilateral gaze-evoked nystagmus, borderline impaired smooth pursuit, and a complete contraversive ocular tilt reaction. The VOR gain was reduced for head impulses directed contralateral to the lesion, and there was also an ipsilesional caloric weakness. All abnormalities progressively improved at follow-up visits but with a considerable reduction in volume of the affected flocculus on imaging. The vestibular and ocular motor findings, qualitatively similar to a previously reported patient, further clarify the “acute floccular syndrome” in humans. We also add new information about the pattern of recovery from such a lesion with corresponding changes in the size of the affected flocculus on imaging.

Journal

The CerebellumSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 26, 2017

References

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