The evaluation of the effect of venous diameter measurement by ultrasonography on pain and withdrawal response

The evaluation of the effect of venous diameter measurement by ultrasonography on pain and... Purpose Rocuronium and propofol are used in the induction of anesthesia give discomfort to the patients. We aimed to investigate the relationship between venous diameter measured using ultrasonography, and pain and withdrawal movements after propofol and rocuronium applied with intravenous (IV). Methods This prospective-observational study was performed on 142 voluntary patients undergoing surgical operation under general anesthesia. An ultrasonography was used to measure the vein transverse diameter. Patients with a venous transverse diameter of ≤2 mm were classified as group 1 ( n = 50), while patients with a diameter of > 2 mm were classified as group 2 (n = 92). The propofol pain was assessed according to the verbal rating scale (VRS). In addition, the withdrawal movements of the rocuronium injection were evaluated using the four-point scale. Results There was no difference between the two groups in terms of the demographic data. The patients have pain after propofol 38.2% and withdrawal movements after rocuronium 42.4% were detected. The maximum number of patients without pain after propofol injection (78.2%) and without withdrawal movements after rocuronium (76%) was found to be higher in group 2 (p = 0.001). Conclusion In this study, we found a reduction in the incidence and severity http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Anesthesia Springer Journals

The evaluation of the effect of venous diameter measurement by ultrasonography on pain and withdrawal response

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/the-evaluation-of-the-effect-of-venous-diameter-measurement-by-JYTMBXWbSe
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Anesthesiology; Pain Medicine; Intensive / Critical Care Medicine; Emergency Medicine
ISSN
0913-8668
eISSN
1438-8359
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00540-018-2489-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose Rocuronium and propofol are used in the induction of anesthesia give discomfort to the patients. We aimed to investigate the relationship between venous diameter measured using ultrasonography, and pain and withdrawal movements after propofol and rocuronium applied with intravenous (IV). Methods This prospective-observational study was performed on 142 voluntary patients undergoing surgical operation under general anesthesia. An ultrasonography was used to measure the vein transverse diameter. Patients with a venous transverse diameter of ≤2 mm were classified as group 1 ( n = 50), while patients with a diameter of > 2 mm were classified as group 2 (n = 92). The propofol pain was assessed according to the verbal rating scale (VRS). In addition, the withdrawal movements of the rocuronium injection were evaluated using the four-point scale. Results There was no difference between the two groups in terms of the demographic data. The patients have pain after propofol 38.2% and withdrawal movements after rocuronium 42.4% were detected. The maximum number of patients without pain after propofol injection (78.2%) and without withdrawal movements after rocuronium (76%) was found to be higher in group 2 (p = 0.001). Conclusion In this study, we found a reduction in the incidence and severity

Journal

Journal of AnesthesiaSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 23, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off