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The evaluation of protective and mitigating effects of vitamin C against side effects induced by radioiodine therapy

The evaluation of protective and mitigating effects of vitamin C against side effects induced by... The goal of this study was to evaluate the protective and mitigative effect of vitamin C on oxidative stress in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients ablated with radioiodine. 58 DTC patients selected for radioactive iodine therapy (RAIT) with 5550 MBq 131Iodine were divided into four groups. Group 1 (control group) consisted of patients who underwent RAIT routinely. Other patients received 1500 mg vitamin C daily 2 days after (group 2), 2 days before to 2 days after (group 3) and 2 days before RAIT (group 4). Serum oxidative stress markers including malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured immediately before and 2 days after RAIT. A significant increase in MDA after RAIT was observed in all groups (p < 0.05). The concentrations of MDA were significantly higher in the control group compared to the intervention groups (p < 0.05). A significant decrease in the control group (p < 0.05) and increase in group 4 (p < 0.05) were observed in GSH level after RAIT (p < 0.05). Mean variation of GSH was significant between control group with groups 3 (p < 0.01) and 4 (p < 0.01). The results indicate that activity of SOD remained unchanged in all groups (p > 0.05). A significant increase was observed in CAT activity after RAIT in all groups (p < 0.05), which was higher in control group than intervention groups. In groups 3 (p < 0.05) and 4 (p < 0.05), this increase in CAT activity was significantly lower than the control group. RAIT causes serum oxidative stress, which can be ameliorated using vitamin C as an antioxidant. These results indicate that radioprotective effect of vitamin C is preferable to its mitigative effect. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Radiation and Environmental Biophysics Springer Journals

The evaluation of protective and mitigating effects of vitamin C against side effects induced by radioiodine therapy

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References (55)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Physics; Biological and Medical Physics, Biophysics; Effects of Radiation/Radiation Protection; Environmental Physics; Monitoring/Environmental Analysis; Ecosystems
ISSN
0301-634X
eISSN
1432-2099
DOI
10.1007/s00411-018-0744-7
pmid
29860661
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The goal of this study was to evaluate the protective and mitigative effect of vitamin C on oxidative stress in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients ablated with radioiodine. 58 DTC patients selected for radioactive iodine therapy (RAIT) with 5550 MBq 131Iodine were divided into four groups. Group 1 (control group) consisted of patients who underwent RAIT routinely. Other patients received 1500 mg vitamin C daily 2 days after (group 2), 2 days before to 2 days after (group 3) and 2 days before RAIT (group 4). Serum oxidative stress markers including malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured immediately before and 2 days after RAIT. A significant increase in MDA after RAIT was observed in all groups (p < 0.05). The concentrations of MDA were significantly higher in the control group compared to the intervention groups (p < 0.05). A significant decrease in the control group (p < 0.05) and increase in group 4 (p < 0.05) were observed in GSH level after RAIT (p < 0.05). Mean variation of GSH was significant between control group with groups 3 (p < 0.01) and 4 (p < 0.01). The results indicate that activity of SOD remained unchanged in all groups (p > 0.05). A significant increase was observed in CAT activity after RAIT in all groups (p < 0.05), which was higher in control group than intervention groups. In groups 3 (p < 0.05) and 4 (p < 0.05), this increase in CAT activity was significantly lower than the control group. RAIT causes serum oxidative stress, which can be ameliorated using vitamin C as an antioxidant. These results indicate that radioprotective effect of vitamin C is preferable to its mitigative effect.

Journal

Radiation and Environmental BiophysicsSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 2, 2018

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