The endosymbiont Wolbachia in Eurasian populations of Drosophila melanogaster

The endosymbiont Wolbachia in Eurasian populations of Drosophila melanogaster The endosymbiotic α-proteobacteria Wolbachia is widely spread among arthropods and Filariidae nematodes. This bacterium is transmitted vertically via a transovarian route. Wolbachia is a cause of several reproductive abnormalities in the host species. We analyzed the isofemale lines created using flies collected from Drosophila melanogaster natural populations for infection with the endosymbiont Wolbachia. Wolbachia were genotyped according to five variable markers: the presence of insertion sequence IS5 in two loci, the copy number of two minisatellite repeats, and an inversion. Overall, 665 isofemale lines isolated from the populations of D. melanogaster from Ukraine, Belarus, Moldova, Caucasus, Central Asia, Ural, Udmurtia, Altai, West and East Siberia, and Far East in 1974 through 2005 were used in the work. The samples from Ukrainian, Altaian, and Middle Asian populations were largest. The infection rate of D. melanogaster populations from Middle Asia, Altaian, and Eastern Europe (Ukraine, Moldavia, and Belarus) with Wolbachia amounted to 64, 56, and 39%, respectively. The D. melanogaster population from the Caucasus displayed heterogeneity in the genotypes of this cytoplasmic infection. The Wolbachia genotype wMel, detected in all the populations studied, was the most abundant. The genotype wMelCS2 was always present in the populations from Middle Asia and Altai and was among the rare variants in the D. melanogaster populations from the Eastern Europe. Single instances of the Wolbachia genotype wMelCS occurred in a few flies from the Central Asian and Altai populations, but was not found this genotype in the other regions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Genetics Springer Journals

The endosymbiont Wolbachia in Eurasian populations of Drosophila melanogaster

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/the-endosymbiont-wolbachia-in-eurasian-populations-of-drosophila-ti0CnEiu7b
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Pleiades Publishing, Inc.
Subject
Biomedicine; Human Genetics; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Microbial Genetics and Genomics
ISSN
1022-7954
eISSN
1608-3369
D.O.I.
10.1134/S102279540707006X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The endosymbiotic α-proteobacteria Wolbachia is widely spread among arthropods and Filariidae nematodes. This bacterium is transmitted vertically via a transovarian route. Wolbachia is a cause of several reproductive abnormalities in the host species. We analyzed the isofemale lines created using flies collected from Drosophila melanogaster natural populations for infection with the endosymbiont Wolbachia. Wolbachia were genotyped according to five variable markers: the presence of insertion sequence IS5 in two loci, the copy number of two minisatellite repeats, and an inversion. Overall, 665 isofemale lines isolated from the populations of D. melanogaster from Ukraine, Belarus, Moldova, Caucasus, Central Asia, Ural, Udmurtia, Altai, West and East Siberia, and Far East in 1974 through 2005 were used in the work. The samples from Ukrainian, Altaian, and Middle Asian populations were largest. The infection rate of D. melanogaster populations from Middle Asia, Altaian, and Eastern Europe (Ukraine, Moldavia, and Belarus) with Wolbachia amounted to 64, 56, and 39%, respectively. The D. melanogaster population from the Caucasus displayed heterogeneity in the genotypes of this cytoplasmic infection. The Wolbachia genotype wMel, detected in all the populations studied, was the most abundant. The genotype wMelCS2 was always present in the populations from Middle Asia and Altai and was among the rare variants in the D. melanogaster populations from the Eastern Europe. Single instances of the Wolbachia genotype wMelCS occurred in a few flies from the Central Asian and Altai populations, but was not found this genotype in the other regions.

Journal

Russian Journal of GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 23, 2007

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off