The Effects of Prior Cold Work on the Shock Response of Copper

The Effects of Prior Cold Work on the Shock Response of Copper A series of experiments have been performed to probe the effects of dislocation density on the shock response of copper. The shear strength immediately behind the shock front has been measured using embedded manganin stress gauges, whilst the post shock microstructural and mechanical response has been monitored via one-dimensional recovery experiments. Material in the half hard (high dislocation density) condition was shown to have both a higher shear strength and higher rate of change of shear strength with impact stress than its annealed (low dislocation density) counterpart. Microstructural analysis showed a much higher dislocation density in the half hard material compared to the annealed after shock loading, whilst post shock mechanical examination showed a significant degree of hardening in the annealed state with reduced, but still significant amount in the half hard state, thus showing a correlation between temporally resolved stress gauge measurements and post shock microstructural and mechanical properties. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Dynamic Behavior of Materials Springer Journals

The Effects of Prior Cold Work on the Shock Response of Copper

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Her Majesty the Queen in right of United Kingdom
Subject
Materials Science; Metallic Materials; Continuum Mechanics and Mechanics of Materials
ISSN
2199-7446
eISSN
2199-7454
D.O.I.
10.1007/s40870-018-0149-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A series of experiments have been performed to probe the effects of dislocation density on the shock response of copper. The shear strength immediately behind the shock front has been measured using embedded manganin stress gauges, whilst the post shock microstructural and mechanical response has been monitored via one-dimensional recovery experiments. Material in the half hard (high dislocation density) condition was shown to have both a higher shear strength and higher rate of change of shear strength with impact stress than its annealed (low dislocation density) counterpart. Microstructural analysis showed a much higher dislocation density in the half hard material compared to the annealed after shock loading, whilst post shock mechanical examination showed a significant degree of hardening in the annealed state with reduced, but still significant amount in the half hard state, thus showing a correlation between temporally resolved stress gauge measurements and post shock microstructural and mechanical properties.

Journal

Journal of Dynamic Behavior of MaterialsSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 24, 2018

References

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