The effects of non-host plant extracts on electroantennogram responses, behavior and egg hatching of codling moth, Cydia pomonella

The effects of non-host plant extracts on electroantennogram responses, behavior and egg hatching... The codling moth (Cydia pomonella L.) is a significant pest of pome fruit throughout the world. Behavioral and ovicidal activities of five non-host plant extracts (Arctium lappa, Bifora radians, Humulus lupulus, Verbascum songaricum, Xanthium strumarium), synthetic sex pheromone, (E,E)-8,10-dodecadienol (codlemone), and the plant volatile lure, (2E,4Z)-2,4-decadienoate (pear ester) were evaluated against the codling moth, C. pomonella L. Codlemone elicited the greatest electroantennogram (EAG) response (6.2 ± 1.2 mV) of the compounds tested from male C. pomonella while pear ester elicited 1.7 ± 0.1 mV EAG response in female moths. Codlemone attracted 34.5% of male C. pomonella in olfactometer studies, and it was followed by the X. strumarium extract with 24.8%. There was a significant difference between the behavior of unmated and mated females. V. songaricum extract was the most active extract, attracting 25.4% of unmated females. However, mated C. pomonella females exhibited greatest attraction to pear ester. In a wind tunnel bioassay, combining X. strumarium with codlemone significantly increased the response of male upwind flight and source contact as compared with codlemone alone. All plant extracts, except for V. songaricum, significantly reduced the number of eggs laid. The plant extracts exhibited some toxic effects to eggs, and hatching rate of eggs was reduced as compared with the control. Our results indicate that some of the plant extracts tested are potential candidates for practical use after elucidation and characterization of active compound(s). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Pest Science Springer Journals

The effects of non-host plant extracts on electroantennogram responses, behavior and egg hatching of codling moth, Cydia pomonella

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Entomology; Agriculture; Plant Pathology; Ecology; Forestry; Plant Sciences
ISSN
1612-4758
eISSN
1612-4766
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10340-018-0953-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The codling moth (Cydia pomonella L.) is a significant pest of pome fruit throughout the world. Behavioral and ovicidal activities of five non-host plant extracts (Arctium lappa, Bifora radians, Humulus lupulus, Verbascum songaricum, Xanthium strumarium), synthetic sex pheromone, (E,E)-8,10-dodecadienol (codlemone), and the plant volatile lure, (2E,4Z)-2,4-decadienoate (pear ester) were evaluated against the codling moth, C. pomonella L. Codlemone elicited the greatest electroantennogram (EAG) response (6.2 ± 1.2 mV) of the compounds tested from male C. pomonella while pear ester elicited 1.7 ± 0.1 mV EAG response in female moths. Codlemone attracted 34.5% of male C. pomonella in olfactometer studies, and it was followed by the X. strumarium extract with 24.8%. There was a significant difference between the behavior of unmated and mated females. V. songaricum extract was the most active extract, attracting 25.4% of unmated females. However, mated C. pomonella females exhibited greatest attraction to pear ester. In a wind tunnel bioassay, combining X. strumarium with codlemone significantly increased the response of male upwind flight and source contact as compared with codlemone alone. All plant extracts, except for V. songaricum, significantly reduced the number of eggs laid. The plant extracts exhibited some toxic effects to eggs, and hatching rate of eggs was reduced as compared with the control. Our results indicate that some of the plant extracts tested are potential candidates for practical use after elucidation and characterization of active compound(s).

Journal

Journal of Pest ScienceSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 23, 2018

References

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