The effects of marriage on volunteering and mental health: moderated mediation analysis

The effects of marriage on volunteering and mental health: moderated mediation analysis Past research has claimed that more volunteering experience could reduce an individual’s risk of depression. However, this conclusion may be too simplistic. This study aims to explore the effect of marriage within the complex relationships among volunteering, depression, and subjective well-being, which is utilized as the mediator. The 1,934 participants were randomly recruited from Taiwan. All the participants were asked to complete Subjective Well-Being Scale and Taiwan Depression Scale. The findings indicate that subjective well-being is a bridging-factor between volunteering and depression; whereas the model produces varied results according to marital status. For ‘single’ and ‘married’ people, subject well-being is a mediator, while for ‘never married’ people, that is a suppressor in the relationship between volunteering and depression. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality & Quantity Springer Journals

The effects of marriage on volunteering and mental health: moderated mediation analysis

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Social Sciences, general; Methodology of the Social Sciences; Social Sciences, general
ISSN
0033-5177
eISSN
1573-7845
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11135-012-9663-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Past research has claimed that more volunteering experience could reduce an individual’s risk of depression. However, this conclusion may be too simplistic. This study aims to explore the effect of marriage within the complex relationships among volunteering, depression, and subjective well-being, which is utilized as the mediator. The 1,934 participants were randomly recruited from Taiwan. All the participants were asked to complete Subjective Well-Being Scale and Taiwan Depression Scale. The findings indicate that subjective well-being is a bridging-factor between volunteering and depression; whereas the model produces varied results according to marital status. For ‘single’ and ‘married’ people, subject well-being is a mediator, while for ‘never married’ people, that is a suppressor in the relationship between volunteering and depression.

Journal

Quality & QuantitySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 15, 2012

References

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