The effects of individual circadian rhythm differences on insomnia, impulsivity, and food addiction

The effects of individual circadian rhythm differences on insomnia, impulsivity, and food addiction Purpose Individuals can generally be divided into morning, neither and evening types according to behavioral, psychologi- cal, and biological variables including appetite levels, usual meal times, sleep times, and melatonin secretion. These factors together identify a person as being part of a certain chronotype, i.e., as feeling more efficient either in the morning (morning type) or later in the day (evening type). Food addiction is den fi ed as addictive behavior toward palatable foods and is thought to be one of the underlying risk factors for obesity. Our aim in this study was to investigate the relationship between circadian rhythm differences and food addiction via insomnia and impulsivity in university students. Method Participants were 1323 university students, filled out a package of psychological tools, including the Morningness– Eveningness Questionnaire, Insomnia Severity Index, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale Short Form, and Yale Food Addiction Scale. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate direct relation of food addiction with insomnia, impulsivity and obesity, and mediation regression analysis was used to investigate the indirect effect of circadian rhythm differences on food addiction. Results Our findings indicated that evening types were more prone to insomnia and impulsivity, and also insomnia and impulsivity significantly contributed to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity Springer Journals

The effects of individual circadian rhythm differences on insomnia, impulsivity, and food addiction

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Psychiatry
ISSN
1124-4909
eISSN
1590-1262
D.O.I.
10.1007/s40519-018-0518-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose Individuals can generally be divided into morning, neither and evening types according to behavioral, psychologi- cal, and biological variables including appetite levels, usual meal times, sleep times, and melatonin secretion. These factors together identify a person as being part of a certain chronotype, i.e., as feeling more efficient either in the morning (morning type) or later in the day (evening type). Food addiction is den fi ed as addictive behavior toward palatable foods and is thought to be one of the underlying risk factors for obesity. Our aim in this study was to investigate the relationship between circadian rhythm differences and food addiction via insomnia and impulsivity in university students. Method Participants were 1323 university students, filled out a package of psychological tools, including the Morningness– Eveningness Questionnaire, Insomnia Severity Index, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale Short Form, and Yale Food Addiction Scale. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate direct relation of food addiction with insomnia, impulsivity and obesity, and mediation regression analysis was used to investigate the indirect effect of circadian rhythm differences on food addiction. Results Our findings indicated that evening types were more prone to insomnia and impulsivity, and also insomnia and impulsivity significantly contributed to

Journal

Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and ObesitySpringer Journals

Published: May 31, 2018

References

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