The effect of phylogenetic signal reduction on genotyping of hepatitis E viruses of the species Orthohepevirus A

The effect of phylogenetic signal reduction on genotyping of hepatitis E viruses of the species... Commonly, hepatitis E virus (HEV) sequences are genotyped phylogenetically using subgenomic sequences. This paper examines this practice with sequences from members of the species Orthohepevirus A. As the length of sequences becomes progressively shorter, the number of identical sequences in an alignment tends to increase; however, these sequences retain their genotypic identity down to 100 nucleotides in length. The best substitution models tend to become less parameterized, bootstrap support decreases, and trees created from short subgenomic fragments are less likely to be isomorphic with trees from longer subgenomic fragments or complete genome sequences. However, it is still possible to correctly genotype sequences using fragments as small as 200 nucleotides. While it is possible to correctly genotype sequences with short subgenomic sequences, the estimates of evolutionary relationships between genotypes degrade to such an extent that sequences below 1600 nucleotides long cannot be used reliably to study these relationships, and comparisons of trees from different subgenomic regions with little or no sequence overlap can be problematic. Subtyping may be done, but it requires a careful examination of the region to be used to ensure that it correctly resolves the subtypes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Virology Springer Journals

The effect of phylogenetic signal reduction on genotyping of hepatitis E viruses of the species Orthohepevirus A

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/the-effect-of-phylogenetic-signal-reduction-on-genotyping-of-hepatitis-huf0u86s0t
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Springer-Verlag Wien (Outside the USA)
Subject
Biomedicine; Virology; Medical Microbiology; Infectious Diseases
ISSN
0304-8608
eISSN
1432-8798
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00705-016-3135-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Commonly, hepatitis E virus (HEV) sequences are genotyped phylogenetically using subgenomic sequences. This paper examines this practice with sequences from members of the species Orthohepevirus A. As the length of sequences becomes progressively shorter, the number of identical sequences in an alignment tends to increase; however, these sequences retain their genotypic identity down to 100 nucleotides in length. The best substitution models tend to become less parameterized, bootstrap support decreases, and trees created from short subgenomic fragments are less likely to be isomorphic with trees from longer subgenomic fragments or complete genome sequences. However, it is still possible to correctly genotype sequences using fragments as small as 200 nucleotides. While it is possible to correctly genotype sequences with short subgenomic sequences, the estimates of evolutionary relationships between genotypes degrade to such an extent that sequences below 1600 nucleotides long cannot be used reliably to study these relationships, and comparisons of trees from different subgenomic regions with little or no sequence overlap can be problematic. Subtyping may be done, but it requires a careful examination of the region to be used to ensure that it correctly resolves the subtypes.

Journal

Archives of VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Nov 5, 2016

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off