The effect of low- and high-power microwave irradiation on in vitro grown Sequoia plants and their recovery after cryostorage

The effect of low- and high-power microwave irradiation on in vitro grown Sequoia plants and... Two distinct microwave power levels and techniques have been studied in two cases: low-power microwave (LPM) irradiation on in vitro Sequoia plants and high-power microwave (HPM) exposure on recovery rates of cryostored (−196°C) Sequoia shoot apices. Experimental variants for LPM exposure included: (a) in vitro plants grown in regular conditions (at 24 ± 1°C during a 16-h light photoperiod with a light intensity of 39.06 μEm−2 s−1 photosynthetically active radiation), (b) in vitro plants grown in the anechoic chamber with controlled environment without microwave irradiation, and (c) in vitro plants grown in the anechoic chamber with LPM irradiation for various times (5, 15, 30, 40 days). In comparison to control plants, significant differences in shoot multiplication and growth parameters (length of shoots and roots) were observed after 40 days of LPM exposure. An opposite effect was achieved regarding the content of total soluble proteins, which decreased with increasing exposure time to LPM. HPM irradiation was tested as a novel rewarming method following storage in liquid nitrogen. To our knowledge, this is the first report using this type of rewarming method. Although, shoot tips subjected to HPM exposure showed 28% recovery following cryostorage compared to 44% for shoot tips rewarmed in liquid medium at 22 ± 1 °C, we consider that the method represent a basis and can be further improved. The results lead to the overall conclusion that LPM had a stimulating effect on growth and multiplication of in vitro Sequoia plants, while the HPM used for rewarming of cryopreserved apices was not effective to achieve high rates of regrowth after liquid nitrogen exposure. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Biological Physics Springer Journals

The effect of low- and high-power microwave irradiation on in vitro grown Sequoia plants and their recovery after cryostorage

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Physics; Biological and Medical Physics, Biophysics; Biochemistry, general; Complex Systems; Neurosciences; Soft and Granular Matter, Complex Fluids and Microfluidics
ISSN
0092-0606
eISSN
1573-0689
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10867-017-9457-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Two distinct microwave power levels and techniques have been studied in two cases: low-power microwave (LPM) irradiation on in vitro Sequoia plants and high-power microwave (HPM) exposure on recovery rates of cryostored (−196°C) Sequoia shoot apices. Experimental variants for LPM exposure included: (a) in vitro plants grown in regular conditions (at 24 ± 1°C during a 16-h light photoperiod with a light intensity of 39.06 μEm−2 s−1 photosynthetically active radiation), (b) in vitro plants grown in the anechoic chamber with controlled environment without microwave irradiation, and (c) in vitro plants grown in the anechoic chamber with LPM irradiation for various times (5, 15, 30, 40 days). In comparison to control plants, significant differences in shoot multiplication and growth parameters (length of shoots and roots) were observed after 40 days of LPM exposure. An opposite effect was achieved regarding the content of total soluble proteins, which decreased with increasing exposure time to LPM. HPM irradiation was tested as a novel rewarming method following storage in liquid nitrogen. To our knowledge, this is the first report using this type of rewarming method. Although, shoot tips subjected to HPM exposure showed 28% recovery following cryostorage compared to 44% for shoot tips rewarmed in liquid medium at 22 ± 1 °C, we consider that the method represent a basis and can be further improved. The results lead to the overall conclusion that LPM had a stimulating effect on growth and multiplication of in vitro Sequoia plants, while the HPM used for rewarming of cryopreserved apices was not effective to achieve high rates of regrowth after liquid nitrogen exposure.

Journal

Journal of Biological PhysicsSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 24, 2017

References

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