The Economics of Politics in Comparative Perspective Revisited: An Introduction

The Economics of Politics in Comparative Perspective Revisited: An Introduction Political Behavior, Vol. 19, No. 1, 1997 THE ECONOMICS OF POLITICS IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE REVISITED: An Introduction Christopher J. Anderson and Christopher Wlezien Students of political behavior have long been interested in whether and how economics structures politics. Over the past two and a half decades, much effort has been devoted to investigating the influence of the economy on voting behavior, election outcomes, and government support in democratic polities. A special issue of Political Behavior explicitly addressed these issues some thirteen years ago. Since the publication of that special issue, however, a number of important developments have occurred. Clearly, we have learned a great deal about the influence of the economy on elections. We have been able to establish that there are powerful effects of economic conditions and perceptions at various levels of analysis (see Nan- nestad and Paldam, 1994, for an overview). Increasingly, attention has cen- tered on identifying how the economy influences vote choice; that is, research has focused on which of voters' many economic perceptions are most impor- tant (see especially Lewis-Beck, 1988). The cumulative body of empirical work now supports a sociotropic electorate that votes on the basis of the state of the national economy. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Political Behavior Springer Journals

The Economics of Politics in Comparative Perspective Revisited: An Introduction

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by Plenum Publishing Corporation
Subject
Political Science and International Relations; Political Science; Sociology, general
ISSN
0190-9320
eISSN
1573-6687
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1024889521098
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Political Behavior, Vol. 19, No. 1, 1997 THE ECONOMICS OF POLITICS IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE REVISITED: An Introduction Christopher J. Anderson and Christopher Wlezien Students of political behavior have long been interested in whether and how economics structures politics. Over the past two and a half decades, much effort has been devoted to investigating the influence of the economy on voting behavior, election outcomes, and government support in democratic polities. A special issue of Political Behavior explicitly addressed these issues some thirteen years ago. Since the publication of that special issue, however, a number of important developments have occurred. Clearly, we have learned a great deal about the influence of the economy on elections. We have been able to establish that there are powerful effects of economic conditions and perceptions at various levels of analysis (see Nan- nestad and Paldam, 1994, for an overview). Increasingly, attention has cen- tered on identifying how the economy influences vote choice; that is, research has focused on which of voters' many economic perceptions are most impor- tant (see especially Lewis-Beck, 1988). The cumulative body of empirical work now supports a sociotropic electorate that votes on the basis of the state of the national economy.

Journal

Political BehaviorSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 14, 2004

References

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