The distinctly Canadian origins of cyclopropane

The distinctly Canadian origins of cyclopropane Can J Anesth/J Can Anesth https://doi.org/10.1007/s12630-018-1153-8 IMAGES IN ANESTHESIA Kim E. Turner, BScPhm, MSc, MD, FRCPC Received: 10 May 2018 / Accepted: 10 May 2018 Canadian Anesthesiologists’ Society 2018 There was a worldwide quest during the early part of the 20th century to discover an anesthetic agent that could augment or replace the commonly used agents of the time – namely ether, choloroform, and nitrous oxide. Among those pursuing this line of research was Dr. Velyien E. Henderson, Professor of Pharmacology at the University of Toronto, working with Dr. W. Easson Brown, an assistant in the University’s Department of Pharmacology, who was an anesthesiologist at the Toronto General Hospital. Their initial experimentation with propylene had shown promise when the gas was freshly prepared. After storage under pressure in steel tanks, however, its administration induced nausea and cardiac irregularities. Dr. George H. Lucas, a new chemist working with Dr. Henderson, wondered if the toxic contaminant might be cyclopropane, formed when propylene is prepared. Indeed, his analysis of the stored propylene revealed that its isomer, cyclopropane, was also present in the stored tank. In 1928, Dr. Lucas subsequently isolated and purified a sample of cyclopropane, believing it to be a toxic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Canadian Journal of Anesthesia/Journal canadien d'anesthésie Springer Journals

The distinctly Canadian origins of cyclopropane

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/the-distinctly-canadian-origins-of-cyclopropane-9DDxKiTcYc
Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Canadian Anesthesiologists' Society
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Anesthesiology; Pain Medicine; Intensive / Critical Care Medicine; Pneumology/Respiratory System; Cardiology; Pediatrics
ISSN
0832-610X
eISSN
1496-8975
D.O.I.
10.1007/s12630-018-1153-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Can J Anesth/J Can Anesth https://doi.org/10.1007/s12630-018-1153-8 IMAGES IN ANESTHESIA Kim E. Turner, BScPhm, MSc, MD, FRCPC Received: 10 May 2018 / Accepted: 10 May 2018 Canadian Anesthesiologists’ Society 2018 There was a worldwide quest during the early part of the 20th century to discover an anesthetic agent that could augment or replace the commonly used agents of the time – namely ether, choloroform, and nitrous oxide. Among those pursuing this line of research was Dr. Velyien E. Henderson, Professor of Pharmacology at the University of Toronto, working with Dr. W. Easson Brown, an assistant in the University’s Department of Pharmacology, who was an anesthesiologist at the Toronto General Hospital. Their initial experimentation with propylene had shown promise when the gas was freshly prepared. After storage under pressure in steel tanks, however, its administration induced nausea and cardiac irregularities. Dr. George H. Lucas, a new chemist working with Dr. Henderson, wondered if the toxic contaminant might be cyclopropane, formed when propylene is prepared. Indeed, his analysis of the stored propylene revealed that its isomer, cyclopropane, was also present in the stored tank. In 1928, Dr. Lucas subsequently isolated and purified a sample of cyclopropane, believing it to be a toxic

Journal

Canadian Journal of Anesthesia/Journal canadien d'anesthésieSpringer Journals

Published: May 31, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off