The development and use of a spatially explicit model for river otters to evaluate environmental hazards: a case study on the Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site

The development and use of a spatially explicit model for river otters to evaluate environmental... The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) faces a legacy of radionuclide and metal contamination from industrial processes that occurred throughout the site. Northern river otters (Lontra canadensis) are appropriate receptors for studying the effects of long-term, low-level contamination because they are long-lived, higher trophic level organisms susceptible to accumulating high levels of pollutants. The purpose of this study was to use latrine surveys to examine patterns of wetland latrine usage; explicitly model northern river otter resource selection on the landscape level; and utilize the model results within an ecological risk assessment (ERA) framework to assess potential effects of metals and radiocesium (137Cs) on the population for the SRS as a case study. River drainages and associated wetlands were surveyed for latrine sites and scats were collected and analyzed for 137Cs activity to validate model results. The spatially explicit resource model predicted otter drainage reach use and was used in an ERA to develop exposure models for nine heavy metals as well as 137Cs on the SRS population of river otters. The evaluation predicted that the only contaminant occurring at high enough levels to cause population effects was mercury and that the observed concentrations were probably not high enough to cause significant impairment. However, multiple metals were above action level thresholds. The field validation process showed an unexpected preference for one man-made treatment wetland that was heavily contaminated, showing that the ERA process is complex and must be approached using multiple scales. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Springer Journals

The development and use of a spatially explicit model for river otters to evaluate environmental hazards: a case study on the Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/the-development-and-use-of-a-spatially-explicit-model-for-river-otters-y03lUN70jM
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Environment; Monitoring/Environmental Analysis; Environmental Management; Ecotoxicology; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Ecology
ISSN
0167-6369
eISSN
1573-2959
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10661-018-6752-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) faces a legacy of radionuclide and metal contamination from industrial processes that occurred throughout the site. Northern river otters (Lontra canadensis) are appropriate receptors for studying the effects of long-term, low-level contamination because they are long-lived, higher trophic level organisms susceptible to accumulating high levels of pollutants. The purpose of this study was to use latrine surveys to examine patterns of wetland latrine usage; explicitly model northern river otter resource selection on the landscape level; and utilize the model results within an ecological risk assessment (ERA) framework to assess potential effects of metals and radiocesium (137Cs) on the population for the SRS as a case study. River drainages and associated wetlands were surveyed for latrine sites and scats were collected and analyzed for 137Cs activity to validate model results. The spatially explicit resource model predicted otter drainage reach use and was used in an ERA to develop exposure models for nine heavy metals as well as 137Cs on the SRS population of river otters. The evaluation predicted that the only contaminant occurring at high enough levels to cause population effects was mercury and that the observed concentrations were probably not high enough to cause significant impairment. However, multiple metals were above action level thresholds. The field validation process showed an unexpected preference for one man-made treatment wetland that was heavily contaminated, showing that the ERA process is complex and must be approached using multiple scales.

Journal

Environmental Monitoring and AssessmentSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 2, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off