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The deep continental subsurface: the dark biosphere

The deep continental subsurface: the dark biosphere Although information from devoted geomicrobiological drilling studies is limited, it is clear that the results obtained so far call for a systematic exploration of the deep continental subsurface, similar to what has been accomplished in recent years by the Ocean Drilling Initiatives. In addition to devoted drillings from the surface, much of the continental subsurface data has been obtained using different subterranean “windows,” each with their correspondent limitations. In general, the number and diversity of microorganisms decrease with depth, and the abundance of Bacteria is superior to Archaea. Within Bacteria, the most commonly detected phyla correspond to Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. Within Archaea, methanogens are recurrently detected in most analyzed subsurface samples. One of the most controversial topics in the study of subsurface environments is whether the available energy source is endogenous or partly dependent on products photosynthetically generated in the subsurface. More information, at better depth resolution, is needed to build up the catalog of deep subsurface microbiota and the biologically available electron acceptors and donors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Microbiology Springer Journals

The deep continental subsurface: the dark biosphere

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Microbiology; Medical Microbiology; Microbial Ecology; Applied Microbiology; Eukaryotic Microbiology
ISSN
1139-6709
eISSN
1618-1905
DOI
10.1007/s10123-018-0009-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although information from devoted geomicrobiological drilling studies is limited, it is clear that the results obtained so far call for a systematic exploration of the deep continental subsurface, similar to what has been accomplished in recent years by the Ocean Drilling Initiatives. In addition to devoted drillings from the surface, much of the continental subsurface data has been obtained using different subterranean “windows,” each with their correspondent limitations. In general, the number and diversity of microorganisms decrease with depth, and the abundance of Bacteria is superior to Archaea. Within Bacteria, the most commonly detected phyla correspond to Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. Within Archaea, methanogens are recurrently detected in most analyzed subsurface samples. One of the most controversial topics in the study of subsurface environments is whether the available energy source is endogenous or partly dependent on products photosynthetically generated in the subsurface. More information, at better depth resolution, is needed to build up the catalog of deep subsurface microbiota and the biologically available electron acceptors and donors.

Journal

International MicrobiologySpringer Journals

Published: May 30, 2018

References