The components of landline telephone survey coverage bias. The relative importance of no-phone and mobile-only populations

The components of landline telephone survey coverage bias. The relative importance of no-phone... The continuously growing mobile-only population raises concerns regarding the representativeness of traditional landline telephone surveys. At this time, the mobile-only population differs significantly from general population, which leads to coverage bias when using fixed-line samples only for telephone surveys. However, in many European countries the mobile-only population is not the only source of coverage bias in telephone surveys. In addition, we have to consider coverage biases caused by considerable proportions of citizens without any telephone service. Since these two groups differ from the general population with respect to differential socio-demographic categories, in our view, the negative effects of mobile-only coverage error in traditional landline telephone surveys might in fact compensate—in part—for coverage bias caused by the no-phone population. To test this hypothesis of compensating coverage biases we calculated relative coverage biases caused by the mobile-only population and relative coverage biases caused by the no-phone population in 30 European countries for two socio-demographic variables in two points in time. Results are presented for four groups of countries that differ with respect to no-phone and mobile-only rates. Results suggest that—in general—mobile-only biases and no-phone biases do not compensate to a great extent, and thus the alarming mobile-only biases cannot be neglected when using telephone surveys in the estimation of population parameters. Nevertheless, there are several countries where the bias caused by the mobile-only population is far bigger than the joint bias caused by the mobile-only population and the no-phone population. This finding suggests that biases caused by the recent mobile-only population would be even more severe if the no-phone population did not exist. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality & Quantity Springer Journals

The components of landline telephone survey coverage bias. The relative importance of no-phone and mobile-only populations

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Social Sciences; Methodology of the Social Sciences; Social Sciences, general
ISSN
0033-5177
eISSN
1573-7845
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11135-011-9431-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The continuously growing mobile-only population raises concerns regarding the representativeness of traditional landline telephone surveys. At this time, the mobile-only population differs significantly from general population, which leads to coverage bias when using fixed-line samples only for telephone surveys. However, in many European countries the mobile-only population is not the only source of coverage bias in telephone surveys. In addition, we have to consider coverage biases caused by considerable proportions of citizens without any telephone service. Since these two groups differ from the general population with respect to differential socio-demographic categories, in our view, the negative effects of mobile-only coverage error in traditional landline telephone surveys might in fact compensate—in part—for coverage bias caused by the no-phone population. To test this hypothesis of compensating coverage biases we calculated relative coverage biases caused by the mobile-only population and relative coverage biases caused by the no-phone population in 30 European countries for two socio-demographic variables in two points in time. Results are presented for four groups of countries that differ with respect to no-phone and mobile-only rates. Results suggest that—in general—mobile-only biases and no-phone biases do not compensate to a great extent, and thus the alarming mobile-only biases cannot be neglected when using telephone surveys in the estimation of population parameters. Nevertheless, there are several countries where the bias caused by the mobile-only population is far bigger than the joint bias caused by the mobile-only population and the no-phone population. This finding suggests that biases caused by the recent mobile-only population would be even more severe if the no-phone population did not exist.

Journal

Quality & QuantitySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 30, 2011

References

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