The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii proteins Ccp1 and Ccp2 are required for long-term growth, but are not necessary for efficient photosynthesis, in a low-CO2 environment

The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii proteins Ccp1 and Ccp2 are required for long-term growth, but are... The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii acclimates to a low-CO2 environment by modifying the expression of a number of messages. Many of the genes that increase in abundance during acclimation to low−2 are under the control of the putative transcription factor Cia5. C. reinhardtii mutants null for cia5 do not express several of the known low−2 inducible genes and do not grow in a low−2 environment. Two of the genes under the control of Cia5, Ccp1 and Ccp2, encode polypeptides that are localized to the chloroplast envelope and have a high degree of similarity to members of the mitochondrial carrier family of proteins. Since their discovery, Ccp1/2 have been candidates for bicarbonate uptake proteins of the chloroplast envelope membrane. In this report, RNA interference was successful in dramatically decreasing the abundance of the mRNAs for Ccp1 and Ccp2. The abundance of the Ccp1 and Ccp2 proteins were also reduced in the RNAi strains. The RNAi strains grew slower than WT in a low−2 environment, but did not exhibit a mutant carbon concentrating phenotype as determined by the cells’ apparent affinity for dissolved inorganic carbon. Possible explanations of this RNAi phenotype are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii proteins Ccp1 and Ccp2 are required for long-term growth, but are not necessary for efficient photosynthesis, in a low-CO2 environment

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Sciences; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11103-004-2650-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii acclimates to a low-CO2 environment by modifying the expression of a number of messages. Many of the genes that increase in abundance during acclimation to low−2 are under the control of the putative transcription factor Cia5. C. reinhardtii mutants null for cia5 do not express several of the known low−2 inducible genes and do not grow in a low−2 environment. Two of the genes under the control of Cia5, Ccp1 and Ccp2, encode polypeptides that are localized to the chloroplast envelope and have a high degree of similarity to members of the mitochondrial carrier family of proteins. Since their discovery, Ccp1/2 have been candidates for bicarbonate uptake proteins of the chloroplast envelope membrane. In this report, RNA interference was successful in dramatically decreasing the abundance of the mRNAs for Ccp1 and Ccp2. The abundance of the Ccp1 and Ccp2 proteins were also reduced in the RNAi strains. The RNAi strains grew slower than WT in a low−2 environment, but did not exhibit a mutant carbon concentrating phenotype as determined by the cells’ apparent affinity for dissolved inorganic carbon. Possible explanations of this RNAi phenotype are discussed.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 30, 2004

References

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