The Charlie Sheen Effect on Rapid In-home Human Immunodeficiency Virus Test Sales

The Charlie Sheen Effect on Rapid In-home Human Immunodeficiency Virus Test Sales One in eight of the 1.2 million Americans living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are unaware of their positive status, and untested individuals are responsible for most new infections. As a result, testing is the most cost-effective HIV prevention strategy and must be accelerated when opportunities are presented. Web searches for HIV spiked around actor Charlie Sheen’s HIV-positive disclosure. However, it is unknown whether Sheen’s disclosure impacted offline behaviors like HIV testing. The goal of this study was to determine if Sheen’s HIV disclosure was a record-setting HIV prevention event and determine if Web searches presage increases in testing allowing for rapid detection and reaction in the future. Sales of OraQuick rapid in-home HIV test kits in the USA were monitored weekly from April 12, 2014, to April 16, 2016, alongside Web searches including the terms “test,” “tests,” or “testing” and “HIV” as accessed from Google Trends. Changes in OraQuick sales around Sheen’s disclosure and prediction models using Web searches were assessed. OraQuick sales rose 95% (95% CI, 75–117; p < 0.001) of the week of Sheen’s disclosure and remained elevated for 4 more weeks (p < 0.05). In total, there were 8225 more sales than expected around Sheen’s disclosure, surpassing World AIDS Day by a factor of about 7. Moreover, Web searches mirrored OraQuick sales trends (r = 0.79), demonstrating their ability to presage increases in testing. The “Charlie Sheen effect” represents an important opportunity for a public health response, and in the future, Web searches can be used to detect and act on more opportunities to foster prevention behaviors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Prevention Science Springer Journals

The Charlie Sheen Effect on Rapid In-home Human Immunodeficiency Virus Test Sales

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/the-charlie-sheen-effect-on-rapid-in-home-human-immunodeficiency-virus-WGKXwUo8ed
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Society for Prevention Research
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Public Health; Health Psychology; Child and School Psychology
ISSN
1389-4986
eISSN
1573-6695
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11121-017-0792-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

One in eight of the 1.2 million Americans living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are unaware of their positive status, and untested individuals are responsible for most new infections. As a result, testing is the most cost-effective HIV prevention strategy and must be accelerated when opportunities are presented. Web searches for HIV spiked around actor Charlie Sheen’s HIV-positive disclosure. However, it is unknown whether Sheen’s disclosure impacted offline behaviors like HIV testing. The goal of this study was to determine if Sheen’s HIV disclosure was a record-setting HIV prevention event and determine if Web searches presage increases in testing allowing for rapid detection and reaction in the future. Sales of OraQuick rapid in-home HIV test kits in the USA were monitored weekly from April 12, 2014, to April 16, 2016, alongside Web searches including the terms “test,” “tests,” or “testing” and “HIV” as accessed from Google Trends. Changes in OraQuick sales around Sheen’s disclosure and prediction models using Web searches were assessed. OraQuick sales rose 95% (95% CI, 75–117; p < 0.001) of the week of Sheen’s disclosure and remained elevated for 4 more weeks (p < 0.05). In total, there were 8225 more sales than expected around Sheen’s disclosure, surpassing World AIDS Day by a factor of about 7. Moreover, Web searches mirrored OraQuick sales trends (r = 0.79), demonstrating their ability to presage increases in testing. The “Charlie Sheen effect” represents an important opportunity for a public health response, and in the future, Web searches can be used to detect and act on more opportunities to foster prevention behaviors.

Journal

Prevention ScienceSpringer Journals

Published: May 18, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off