The Case Against Licensing Health Professionals

The Case Against Licensing Health Professionals Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment, Vol. 10, No. 3, 1998 Opinions Stanley J. Gross1,2 In the interest of full disclosure, I am a licensed psychologist. Yet I oppose licensing. I remain licensed because I wish to continue to practice my profession. My opposition to both general and specialty licensure is the subject of this paper. To understand my position requires knowing that state governments, un- der the umbrella of their police powers, grant licensing to a profession to protect the welfare of the public. The licensing act reserves either a title (i.e., psychologist) or a practice (i.e., psychotherapy) to persons who meet particu- lar requirements approved by the state. Doing so creates a monopoly which in turn grants certain economic advantages to licensees. The history of licen- sure is replete with evidence that economics, not protection of the public, drives licensing. In fact, with rare exceptions (i.e., stockbrokers, detectives), professions have sought licensing—the public has not demanded it. My review of the empirical research shows no substantial relationship between licensing and quality of service measures. Evaluations of the work of licensing agencies also show they do not protect the public (Gross, 1984, 1986): (a) Assessment of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment Springer Journals

The Case Against Licensing Health Professionals

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/the-case-against-licensing-health-professionals-15NYgD3eSP
Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by Plenum Publishing Corporation
Subject
Psychology; Sexual Behavior; Psychiatry; Clinical Psychology; Criminology and Criminal Justice, general
ISSN
1079-0632
eISSN
1573-286X
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1021374105893
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment, Vol. 10, No. 3, 1998 Opinions Stanley J. Gross1,2 In the interest of full disclosure, I am a licensed psychologist. Yet I oppose licensing. I remain licensed because I wish to continue to practice my profession. My opposition to both general and specialty licensure is the subject of this paper. To understand my position requires knowing that state governments, un- der the umbrella of their police powers, grant licensing to a profession to protect the welfare of the public. The licensing act reserves either a title (i.e., psychologist) or a practice (i.e., psychotherapy) to persons who meet particu- lar requirements approved by the state. Doing so creates a monopoly which in turn grants certain economic advantages to licensees. The history of licen- sure is replete with evidence that economics, not protection of the public, drives licensing. In fact, with rare exceptions (i.e., stockbrokers, detectives), professions have sought licensing—the public has not demanded it. My review of the empirical research shows no substantial relationship between licensing and quality of service measures. Evaluations of the work of licensing agencies also show they do not protect the public (Gross, 1984, 1986): (a) Assessment of

Journal

Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and TreatmentSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 6, 2004

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from Google Scholar, PubMed
Create lists to organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off