Temporal dynamics of gut microbiota in triclocarban-exposed weaned rats

Temporal dynamics of gut microbiota in triclocarban-exposed weaned rats Widely used as an antimicrobial in antibacterial bar soaps, triclocarban (3,4,4′-trichlorocarbanilide; TCC) is effective against Gram-positive bacteria but shows little efficacy against Gram-negative strains, potentially altering the composition of indigenous microflora within and on the human body. To date, the consequence of continuous or previous nonprescription antimicrobial exposure from compounds in personal care products on commensal microflora is still elusive. Previous research has shown that TCC exposure during gestation and lactation induced dysbiosis of gut microbial communities among exposed dams and neonates. However, the impact of antimicrobial exposure specifically after discontinuation of the use of TCC on the gut microbiota has not been investigated. In this study, weaned Sprague Dawley rats (postnatal day, PND 22) were provided ad lib access to TCC-supplemented diet (0.2% w/w or 0.5% w/w) for 4 weeks (phase I) followed by a 4-week washout period (phase II) to determine gut microflora changes both during continuous exposure to TCC and to determine the potential rebound following TCC withdrawal. Fecal samples were collected at baseline (PND 22) prior to TCC exposure and throughout phase I and phase II. The V4 region of 16S rDNA was sequenced from extracted total fecal DNA with the MiSeq platform. Exposure to both 0.2% w/w and 0.5% w/w TCC was sufficient to alter diversity of microbiota during phase I of treatment. This effect was further prolonged into phase II, even when TCC exposure was discontinued. Collectively, these data highlight the impact of both continuous and prior TCC exposure on gut microbial ecology and shed light onto the potential long-term health risk of daily nonprescription antimicrobial personal care product use. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Science and Pollution Research Springer Journals
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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Environmental Chemistry; Ecotoxicology; Environmental Health; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution
ISSN
0944-1344
eISSN
1614-7499
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11356-018-1627-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Widely used as an antimicrobial in antibacterial bar soaps, triclocarban (3,4,4′-trichlorocarbanilide; TCC) is effective against Gram-positive bacteria but shows little efficacy against Gram-negative strains, potentially altering the composition of indigenous microflora within and on the human body. To date, the consequence of continuous or previous nonprescription antimicrobial exposure from compounds in personal care products on commensal microflora is still elusive. Previous research has shown that TCC exposure during gestation and lactation induced dysbiosis of gut microbial communities among exposed dams and neonates. However, the impact of antimicrobial exposure specifically after discontinuation of the use of TCC on the gut microbiota has not been investigated. In this study, weaned Sprague Dawley rats (postnatal day, PND 22) were provided ad lib access to TCC-supplemented diet (0.2% w/w or 0.5% w/w) for 4 weeks (phase I) followed by a 4-week washout period (phase II) to determine gut microflora changes both during continuous exposure to TCC and to determine the potential rebound following TCC withdrawal. Fecal samples were collected at baseline (PND 22) prior to TCC exposure and throughout phase I and phase II. The V4 region of 16S rDNA was sequenced from extracted total fecal DNA with the MiSeq platform. Exposure to both 0.2% w/w and 0.5% w/w TCC was sufficient to alter diversity of microbiota during phase I of treatment. This effect was further prolonged into phase II, even when TCC exposure was discontinued. Collectively, these data highlight the impact of both continuous and prior TCC exposure on gut microbial ecology and shed light onto the potential long-term health risk of daily nonprescription antimicrobial personal care product use.

Journal

Environmental Science and Pollution ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 13, 2018

References

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