Tea, coffee, and head and neck cancer risk in a multicenter study in east Asia

Tea, coffee, and head and neck cancer risk in a multicenter study in east Asia Purpose The role of tea or coffee on head and neck cancer (HNC) risk has not been consistent, especially in Asian popula - tions. The aim of the study was to investigate whether tea or coffee is associated with HNC risks in a Chinese population. Methods Our case–control study included 921 head and neck cancer cases and 806 controls. We obtained information on tea and coffee consumption frequency, duration, age at start, strength, and types. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Results No association between tea drinking and HNC risk was observed after adjusting for potential confounders. Cof- fee drinking was inversely associated with oral cavity cancer risk with dose–response trends for both frequency (p for trend = 0.0149) and the duration (p for trend = 0.0167) of intake. When stratified by age, sex, and cigarette smoking, coffee drinking was not clearly associated with head and neck cancer risk in terms of frequency or duration. Conclusion Coffee consumption was associated with a decreased risk of oral cavity cancer. Further investigations with more specific tea consumption-related factors are warranted to examine the relationship between tea drinking and HNC risks. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oral Cancer Springer Journals
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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Dentistry; Dentistry; Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; Oncology
eISSN
2509-8837
D.O.I.
10.1007/s41548-018-0009-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose The role of tea or coffee on head and neck cancer (HNC) risk has not been consistent, especially in Asian popula - tions. The aim of the study was to investigate whether tea or coffee is associated with HNC risks in a Chinese population. Methods Our case–control study included 921 head and neck cancer cases and 806 controls. We obtained information on tea and coffee consumption frequency, duration, age at start, strength, and types. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Results No association between tea drinking and HNC risk was observed after adjusting for potential confounders. Cof- fee drinking was inversely associated with oral cavity cancer risk with dose–response trends for both frequency (p for trend = 0.0149) and the duration (p for trend = 0.0167) of intake. When stratified by age, sex, and cigarette smoking, coffee drinking was not clearly associated with head and neck cancer risk in terms of frequency or duration. Conclusion Coffee consumption was associated with a decreased risk of oral cavity cancer. Further investigations with more specific tea consumption-related factors are warranted to examine the relationship between tea drinking and HNC risks.

Journal

Oral CancerSpringer Journals

Published: May 2, 2018

References

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