Syringe sharing among people who inject drugs in London, Canada

Syringe sharing among people who inject drugs in London, Canada Objectives London, Ontario, is facing an outbreak of HIV among people who inject drugs (PWID), as well as persistently high levels of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Syringe sharing is the primary driver of HIV and HCV transmission risks among PWID, however, little is known about factors contributing to syringe sharing in this setting. Therefore, we sought to characterize syringe sharing and its correlates among London PWID. Methods Between March and April, 2016, PWID participated in a survey administered by peer research associates as part of the Ontario Integrated Supervised Injection Services Feasibility Study. Bivariable and multivariable logistic regression models examined associations with syringe sharing (borrowing or lending previously used syringes) over the previous 6 months. A sub-analysis described patterns of borrowing and lending by self-reported HIV and HCV statuses. Results Of 198 PWID, 44 (22%) reported syringe sharing in the past 6 months. In the multivariable analysis, selling drugs (adjusted odds ratio; AOR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.20–3.08), daily crystal methamphetamine injection (AOR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.07– 2.59), and identifying as HIV-positive (AOR = 3.11, 95% CI = 1.61–6.01) were independently associated with increased syringe sharing. While not independently associated with syringe sharing, problems accessing syringes http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Canadian Journal of Public Health Springer Journals

Syringe sharing among people who inject drugs in London, Canada

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by The Canadian Public Health Association
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Public Health
ISSN
0008-4263
eISSN
1920-7476
D.O.I.
10.17269/s41997-018-0058-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objectives London, Ontario, is facing an outbreak of HIV among people who inject drugs (PWID), as well as persistently high levels of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Syringe sharing is the primary driver of HIV and HCV transmission risks among PWID, however, little is known about factors contributing to syringe sharing in this setting. Therefore, we sought to characterize syringe sharing and its correlates among London PWID. Methods Between March and April, 2016, PWID participated in a survey administered by peer research associates as part of the Ontario Integrated Supervised Injection Services Feasibility Study. Bivariable and multivariable logistic regression models examined associations with syringe sharing (borrowing or lending previously used syringes) over the previous 6 months. A sub-analysis described patterns of borrowing and lending by self-reported HIV and HCV statuses. Results Of 198 PWID, 44 (22%) reported syringe sharing in the past 6 months. In the multivariable analysis, selling drugs (adjusted odds ratio; AOR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.20–3.08), daily crystal methamphetamine injection (AOR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.07– 2.59), and identifying as HIV-positive (AOR = 3.11, 95% CI = 1.61–6.01) were independently associated with increased syringe sharing. While not independently associated with syringe sharing, problems accessing syringes

Journal

Canadian Journal of Public HealthSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 6, 2018

References

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