Syringe Sharing Among a Prospective Cohort of Street-Involved Youth: Implications for Needle Distribution Programs

Syringe Sharing Among a Prospective Cohort of Street-Involved Youth: Implications for Needle... The sharing of previously used syringes is associated with the transmission of Hepatitis C and HIV. This longitudinal study examines syringe borrowing and syringe lending within a prospective cohort of street-involved youth in Vancouver, Canada. From September 2005 to May 2014, data were collected from the At-Risk Youth Study, a cohort of street-involved youth age 14–26 at enrollment, and analyzed using generalized estimating equations. Among 505 participants, 142 (28.1%) reported syringe borrowing and 132 (26.1%) reported syringe lending during the study period. In separate multivariable analyses, having difficulty finding clean needles and homelessness were significantly associated with syringe borrowing (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 2.28, 95% CI 1.66–3.12 and AOR = 1.52, CI 1.05–2.21, respectively) and syringe lending (AOR = 1.89, 95% CI 1.32–2.71 and AOR = 1.65, 95% CI 1.11–2.44, respectively) (all p values < 0.05). Findings highlight gaps in syringe access for vulnerable young injectors and suggest that service delivery for youth may be suboptimal. Further examination of how needle distribution efforts might be improved to better meet the needs of young people is warranted. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS and Behavior Springer Journals

Syringe Sharing Among a Prospective Cohort of Street-Involved Youth: Implications for Needle Distribution Programs

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Public Health; Health Psychology; Infectious Diseases
ISSN
1090-7165
eISSN
1573-3254
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10461-017-1762-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The sharing of previously used syringes is associated with the transmission of Hepatitis C and HIV. This longitudinal study examines syringe borrowing and syringe lending within a prospective cohort of street-involved youth in Vancouver, Canada. From September 2005 to May 2014, data were collected from the At-Risk Youth Study, a cohort of street-involved youth age 14–26 at enrollment, and analyzed using generalized estimating equations. Among 505 participants, 142 (28.1%) reported syringe borrowing and 132 (26.1%) reported syringe lending during the study period. In separate multivariable analyses, having difficulty finding clean needles and homelessness were significantly associated with syringe borrowing (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 2.28, 95% CI 1.66–3.12 and AOR = 1.52, CI 1.05–2.21, respectively) and syringe lending (AOR = 1.89, 95% CI 1.32–2.71 and AOR = 1.65, 95% CI 1.11–2.44, respectively) (all p values < 0.05). Findings highlight gaps in syringe access for vulnerable young injectors and suggest that service delivery for youth may be suboptimal. Further examination of how needle distribution efforts might be improved to better meet the needs of young people is warranted.

Journal

AIDS and BehaviorSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 13, 2017

References

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