Synthesis of Seoul virus RNA and structural proteins in cultured cells

Synthesis of Seoul virus RNA and structural proteins in cultured cells Seoul virus is a hantavirus that causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). The virion has a tripartite (S, M, and L) negative-stranded RNA genome, which is characteristic of the family Bunyaviridae . However, the molecular basis of virus replication is not well known. We established a Northern blot hybridization (NB) procedure using digoxygenin-labeled RNA probes, to quantitate the hantaviral plus- and minus-strand RNAs separately. Virus RNA replication was analyzed in infected Vero E6 cells. When the Vero E6 cells were infected with Seoul virus strain KI-83-262 (KI) at m.o.i. = 0.25, the plus-strand RNA was detected within 1 h post-infection (hpi), and the minus-strand RNA was detected subsequently. Using laser confocal microscopy, the nucleocapsid protein (NP) was detected within 2 hpi, and accumulated as scattered granules in the cytoplasm until 24 hpi. In contrast, the G2 protein first appeared at 8 hpi, was immediately transported to the Golgi, and accumulated in the Golgi until 24 hpi. Infectious virus particles were released into the medium at 24 h hpi. These findings indicate that hantavirus RNA replication starts with the appearance of NP at 2 hpi, glycoproteins then accumulate gradually in the Golgi, and virion formation is initiated once the viral RNAs and proteins have accumulated. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Virology Springer Journals

Synthesis of Seoul virus RNA and structural proteins in cultured cells

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/synthesis-of-seoul-virus-rna-and-structural-proteins-in-cultured-cells-v6CN0scJb1
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by Springer-Verlag/Wien
Subject
LifeSciences
ISSN
0304-8608
eISSN
1432-8798
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00705-003-0141-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Seoul virus is a hantavirus that causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). The virion has a tripartite (S, M, and L) negative-stranded RNA genome, which is characteristic of the family Bunyaviridae . However, the molecular basis of virus replication is not well known. We established a Northern blot hybridization (NB) procedure using digoxygenin-labeled RNA probes, to quantitate the hantaviral plus- and minus-strand RNAs separately. Virus RNA replication was analyzed in infected Vero E6 cells. When the Vero E6 cells were infected with Seoul virus strain KI-83-262 (KI) at m.o.i. = 0.25, the plus-strand RNA was detected within 1 h post-infection (hpi), and the minus-strand RNA was detected subsequently. Using laser confocal microscopy, the nucleocapsid protein (NP) was detected within 2 hpi, and accumulated as scattered granules in the cytoplasm until 24 hpi. In contrast, the G2 protein first appeared at 8 hpi, was immediately transported to the Golgi, and accumulated in the Golgi until 24 hpi. Infectious virus particles were released into the medium at 24 h hpi. These findings indicate that hantavirus RNA replication starts with the appearance of NP at 2 hpi, glycoproteins then accumulate gradually in the Golgi, and virion formation is initiated once the viral RNAs and proteins have accumulated.

Journal

Archives of VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 10, 2002

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off