Synthesis of cobalt-based magnetic nanocrystals from cobalt(II) heterocyclic amine complexes

Synthesis of cobalt-based magnetic nanocrystals from cobalt(II) heterocyclic amine complexes Keywords Magnetic materials  Nanostructures  Chemical reduction  Electron microscopy  X-ray diffraction Introduction Magnetism is a special topic in physics, electrical engineering, material science, chemistry, metallurgy, and other sciences. Understanding magnetic behavior is required in the development of nanomagnetic materials and devices such as magnetic sensors and recording heads. Among the elements of the Periodic Table, Fe, Co, and Ni are the most important metals for use as ferromagnetic elements above room temperature [1]. Because of their attractive properties, most research has focused on magnetic nanoparticles of these metals. As the size of such metallic particles decreases, their surface-to-volume ratio increases and all properties that depend on this ratio change. Thus, nanoparticles show many unusual chemical and physical properties compared with their bulk counterparts [2, 3]. Ferromagnetic elemental nanoparticles have a wide range of applications in catalysts, solar energy absorption, and magnetic recording [4]. Among the above-mentioned magnetic metals, cobalt exhibits the highest magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Due to their specific properties, such as magnetism, thermal resistance, and chemical activity, cobalt metallic nanoparticles have a wide range of applications including in hard alloys, conducting paints, rechargeable batteries, chemical catalysts, optoelectronic applications, and magnetic recording media [5]. Cobalt powders can http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research on Chemical Intermediates Springer Journals

Synthesis of cobalt-based magnetic nanocrystals from cobalt(II) heterocyclic amine complexes

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Chemistry; Catalysis; Physical Chemistry; Inorganic Chemistry
ISSN
0922-6168
eISSN
1568-5675
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11164-016-2785-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Keywords Magnetic materials  Nanostructures  Chemical reduction  Electron microscopy  X-ray diffraction Introduction Magnetism is a special topic in physics, electrical engineering, material science, chemistry, metallurgy, and other sciences. Understanding magnetic behavior is required in the development of nanomagnetic materials and devices such as magnetic sensors and recording heads. Among the elements of the Periodic Table, Fe, Co, and Ni are the most important metals for use as ferromagnetic elements above room temperature [1]. Because of their attractive properties, most research has focused on magnetic nanoparticles of these metals. As the size of such metallic particles decreases, their surface-to-volume ratio increases and all properties that depend on this ratio change. Thus, nanoparticles show many unusual chemical and physical properties compared with their bulk counterparts [2, 3]. Ferromagnetic elemental nanoparticles have a wide range of applications in catalysts, solar energy absorption, and magnetic recording [4]. Among the above-mentioned magnetic metals, cobalt exhibits the highest magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Due to their specific properties, such as magnetism, thermal resistance, and chemical activity, cobalt metallic nanoparticles have a wide range of applications including in hard alloys, conducting paints, rechargeable batteries, chemical catalysts, optoelectronic applications, and magnetic recording media [5]. Cobalt powders can

Journal

Research on Chemical IntermediatesSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 28, 2016

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