Sustainability by Default: Co-creating Care and Relationality Through Early Childhood Education

Sustainability by Default: Co-creating Care and Relationality Through Early Childhood Education In this article, based on a keynote address presented at the 68th OMEP World Assembly and International Conference held in Seoul in July 2016, it is argued that children are more in tune with sustainability than most adults and that both adults and children can benefit from intergenerational dialogue and expanded learning opportunities in so-called ecologies of learning. The idea of growing up in the Anthropocene, the new geological epoch that is shaped by one single species, home sapiens, is introduced. What does growing up in the Anthropocene mean for today’s children? A short critique is provided of the neoliberal forces that increasingly influence what happens in education and care settings and that essentially make unsustainability the default in our society. Drawing on Martin Buber’s ideas of relational ways of being in the world; Nell Nodding’s notions of care; and George Siemen’s ideas about learning ecologies, some suggestions are offered for co-creating early childhood education and care with people and the planet in mind. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Early Childhood Springer Journals

Sustainability by Default: Co-creating Care and Relationality Through Early Childhood Education

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s)
Subject
Education; Early Childhood Education; Education, general; International and Comparative Education
ISSN
0020-7187
eISSN
1878-4658
D.O.I.
10.1007/s13158-017-0193-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this article, based on a keynote address presented at the 68th OMEP World Assembly and International Conference held in Seoul in July 2016, it is argued that children are more in tune with sustainability than most adults and that both adults and children can benefit from intergenerational dialogue and expanded learning opportunities in so-called ecologies of learning. The idea of growing up in the Anthropocene, the new geological epoch that is shaped by one single species, home sapiens, is introduced. What does growing up in the Anthropocene mean for today’s children? A short critique is provided of the neoliberal forces that increasingly influence what happens in education and care settings and that essentially make unsustainability the default in our society. Drawing on Martin Buber’s ideas of relational ways of being in the world; Nell Nodding’s notions of care; and George Siemen’s ideas about learning ecologies, some suggestions are offered for co-creating early childhood education and care with people and the planet in mind.

Journal

International Journal of Early ChildhoodSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 21, 2017

References

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