Suppression of Settlement of Larvae of Fouling Organism by Water-Soluble Substances from Epibiotic Bacteria

Suppression of Settlement of Larvae of Fouling Organism by Water-Soluble Substances from... Twenty-nine bacterial strains were isolated from the surface of the green alga Ulva reticulata, the soft coral Dendronephthya sp., and the sponge Haliclona sp. The bacterial species Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio sp. 4, an unidentified α-Proteobacterium, Vibrio sp. 7, Pseudoalteromonas sp. 2, and Pseudoalteromonas sp. 4 were found to suppress the larval settlement of the polychaete Hydroides elegans (Haswell, 1883) and the bryozoan Bugula neritina (Linnaeus, 1758). Aqueous extracts of five bacteria (all those named above except Pseudoalteromonas sp. 2) prevented larval settlement. Bacteria V. alginolyticus, Vibrio sp. 4, and an unidentified α-Proteobacterium were first discovered to produce high-molecular substances (>100 kDa) preventing larval settlement. Their activity was inhibited by amylase treatment, while trypsin and papain did not influence their activity. The data obtained proved that bacteria from the surface of the number of marine organisms excrete water-soluble sacchariferous compounds preventing larval settlement. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Marine Biology Springer Journals

Suppression of Settlement of Larvae of Fouling Organism by Water-Soluble Substances from Epibiotic Bacteria

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by MAIK "Nauka/Interperiodica"
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology
ISSN
1063-0740
eISSN
1608-3377
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11179-006-0005-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Twenty-nine bacterial strains were isolated from the surface of the green alga Ulva reticulata, the soft coral Dendronephthya sp., and the sponge Haliclona sp. The bacterial species Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio sp. 4, an unidentified α-Proteobacterium, Vibrio sp. 7, Pseudoalteromonas sp. 2, and Pseudoalteromonas sp. 4 were found to suppress the larval settlement of the polychaete Hydroides elegans (Haswell, 1883) and the bryozoan Bugula neritina (Linnaeus, 1758). Aqueous extracts of five bacteria (all those named above except Pseudoalteromonas sp. 2) prevented larval settlement. Bacteria V. alginolyticus, Vibrio sp. 4, and an unidentified α-Proteobacterium were first discovered to produce high-molecular substances (>100 kDa) preventing larval settlement. Their activity was inhibited by amylase treatment, while trypsin and papain did not influence their activity. The data obtained proved that bacteria from the surface of the number of marine organisms excrete water-soluble sacchariferous compounds preventing larval settlement.

Journal

Russian Journal of Marine BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 18, 2006

References

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