Sulfate turpentine: a resource of tick repellent compounds

Sulfate turpentine: a resource of tick repellent compounds Compounds with tick (Ixodes ricinus) repellent properties were isolated from sulfate turpentine consisting of Norway spruce (80%) and Scots pine (20%) from southern Sweden. The turpentine was divided into two fractions by distillation under reduced pressure resulting in one monoterpene hydrocarbon fraction and a residual containing higher boiling terpenoids. The monoterpene fraction was further oxidized with SeO2 to obtain oxygenated monoterpenes with potential tick repellent properties. The oxidized fraction and the high boiling distillation residual were each separated by medium pressure liquid chromatography. The fractions were tested for tick repellency and the compounds in those with highest tick repellency were identified by GC-MS. The fractions with highest repellency contained, mainly (−)-borneol, and mixtures of (+)- and (−)-1-terpineol and terpinen-4-ol. The enantiomers of borneol showed similar tick repellent properties. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Experimental and Applied Acarology Springer Journals

Sulfate turpentine: a resource of tick repellent compounds

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s)
Subject
Life Sciences; Entomology; Animal Systematics/Taxonomy/Biogeography; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Animal Ecology; Life Sciences, general
ISSN
0168-8162
eISSN
1572-9702
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10493-017-0145-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Compounds with tick (Ixodes ricinus) repellent properties were isolated from sulfate turpentine consisting of Norway spruce (80%) and Scots pine (20%) from southern Sweden. The turpentine was divided into two fractions by distillation under reduced pressure resulting in one monoterpene hydrocarbon fraction and a residual containing higher boiling terpenoids. The monoterpene fraction was further oxidized with SeO2 to obtain oxygenated monoterpenes with potential tick repellent properties. The oxidized fraction and the high boiling distillation residual were each separated by medium pressure liquid chromatography. The fractions were tested for tick repellency and the compounds in those with highest tick repellency were identified by GC-MS. The fractions with highest repellency contained, mainly (−)-borneol, and mixtures of (+)- and (−)-1-terpineol and terpinen-4-ol. The enantiomers of borneol showed similar tick repellent properties.

Journal

Experimental and Applied AcarologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 6, 2017

References

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