Sucrose deficiency delays lycopene accumulation in tomato fruit pericarp discs

Sucrose deficiency delays lycopene accumulation in tomato fruit pericarp discs Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit ripening is characterized by a massive accumulation of carotenoids (mainly lycopene) as chloroplasts change to chromoplasts. To address the question of the role of sugars in controlling carotenoid accumulation, fruit pericarp discs (mature green fruits) were cultured in vitro in the presence of various sucrose concentrations. A significant difference in soluble sugar content was achieved depending on external sucrose availability. Sucrose limitation delayed and reduced lycopene and phytoene accumulation, with no significant effect on other carotenoids. Chlorophyll degradation and starch catabolism were not affected by variations of sucrose availability. The reduction of lycopene synthesis observed in sucrose-limited conditions was mediated through metabolic changes illustrated by reduced hexose accumulation levels. In addition, variations of sucrose availability modulated PSY1 gene expression. Taken together our results suggest that the modulation of carotenoid accumulation by sucrose availability occurs at the metabolic level and involves the differential regulation of genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Sucrose deficiency delays lycopene accumulation in tomato fruit pericarp discs

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Pathology; Plant Sciences ; Plant Sciences
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11103-006-9033-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit ripening is characterized by a massive accumulation of carotenoids (mainly lycopene) as chloroplasts change to chromoplasts. To address the question of the role of sugars in controlling carotenoid accumulation, fruit pericarp discs (mature green fruits) were cultured in vitro in the presence of various sucrose concentrations. A significant difference in soluble sugar content was achieved depending on external sucrose availability. Sucrose limitation delayed and reduced lycopene and phytoene accumulation, with no significant effect on other carotenoids. Chlorophyll degradation and starch catabolism were not affected by variations of sucrose availability. The reduction of lycopene synthesis observed in sucrose-limited conditions was mediated through metabolic changes illustrated by reduced hexose accumulation levels. In addition, variations of sucrose availability modulated PSY1 gene expression. Taken together our results suggest that the modulation of carotenoid accumulation by sucrose availability occurs at the metabolic level and involves the differential regulation of genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 17, 2006

References

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