Subject-Specific Axes of Rotation Based on Talar Morphology Do Not Improve Predictions of Tibiotalar and Subtalar Joint Kinematics

Subject-Specific Axes of Rotation Based on Talar Morphology Do Not Improve Predictions of... Use of subject-specific axes of rotation may improve predictions generated by kinematic models, especially for joints with complex anatomy, such as the tibiotalar and subtalar joints of the ankle. The objective of this study was twofold. First, we compared the axes of rotation between generic and subject-specific ankle models for ten control subjects. Second, we quantified the accuracy of generic and subject-specific models for predicting tibiotalar and subtalar joint motion during level walking using inverse kinematics. Here, tibiotalar and subtalar joint kinematics measured in vivo by dual-fluoroscopy served as the reference standard. The generic model was based on a cadaver study, while the subject-specific models were derived from each subject’s talus reconstructed from computed tomography images. The subject-specific and generic axes of rotation were significantly different. The average angle between the modeled axes was 12.9° ± 4.3° and 24.4° ± 5.9° at the tibiotalar and subtalar joints, respectively. However, predictions from both models did not agree well with dynamic dual-fluoroscopy data, where errors ranged from 1.0° to 8.9° and 0.6° to 7.6° for the generic and subject-specific models, respectively. Our results suggest that methods that rely on talar morphology to define subject-specific axes may be inadequate for accurately predicting tibiotalar and subtalar joint kinematics. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Biomedical Engineering Springer Journals

Subject-Specific Axes of Rotation Based on Talar Morphology Do Not Improve Predictions of Tibiotalar and Subtalar Joint Kinematics

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Biomedical Engineering Society
Subject
Biomedicine; Biomedicine, general; Biomedical Engineering; Biological and Medical Physics, Biophysics; Classical Mechanics; Biochemistry, general
ISSN
0090-6964
eISSN
1573-9686
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10439-017-1874-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Use of subject-specific axes of rotation may improve predictions generated by kinematic models, especially for joints with complex anatomy, such as the tibiotalar and subtalar joints of the ankle. The objective of this study was twofold. First, we compared the axes of rotation between generic and subject-specific ankle models for ten control subjects. Second, we quantified the accuracy of generic and subject-specific models for predicting tibiotalar and subtalar joint motion during level walking using inverse kinematics. Here, tibiotalar and subtalar joint kinematics measured in vivo by dual-fluoroscopy served as the reference standard. The generic model was based on a cadaver study, while the subject-specific models were derived from each subject’s talus reconstructed from computed tomography images. The subject-specific and generic axes of rotation were significantly different. The average angle between the modeled axes was 12.9° ± 4.3° and 24.4° ± 5.9° at the tibiotalar and subtalar joints, respectively. However, predictions from both models did not agree well with dynamic dual-fluoroscopy data, where errors ranged from 1.0° to 8.9° and 0.6° to 7.6° for the generic and subject-specific models, respectively. Our results suggest that methods that rely on talar morphology to define subject-specific axes may be inadequate for accurately predicting tibiotalar and subtalar joint kinematics.

Journal

Annals of Biomedical EngineeringSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 21, 2017

References

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